Substance Use Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment in Pediatric Practice: A Quality Improvement Project in the Maryland Adolescent and Young Adult Health Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network

Rachel H. Alinsky, Kayla Percy, Hoover Adger, Diana Fertsch, Maria Trent

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends pediatric providers routinely screen for, assess, and treat substance use and substance use disorders among adolescents, a process called “Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment,” or “SBIRT.” Because there are limited data on how Maryland pediatric practices have adopted SBIRT, a quality improvement initiative was developed within the Maryland Adolescent and Young Adult Health Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network using a “Plan/Do/Study/Act” approach. A 2-part provider training was conducted regarding screening and motivational interviewing, and the “CRAFFT” screening tool was integrated into the practice’s electronic medical record. Results from evaluation demonstrated significant improvements in provider knowledge, attitudes, and screening behavior. The association between substance use and sexual behavior suggests a need for further expansion of this model with inclusion of sexual health screening. Overall, this study demonstrates that SBIRT implementation into a general pediatric practice is highly feasible, acceptable, and shows preliminary effectiveness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)429-435
Number of pages7
JournalClinical pediatrics
Volume59
Issue number4-5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2020

Keywords

  • SBIRT
  • adolescent
  • quality improvement
  • screening
  • sexual health
  • substance use
  • young adult

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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