Substance abuse by young adult chronic patients

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Of 41 chronic psychiatric patients between the ages of 19 and 39 seen at a community mental health center, 44 percent were current substance abusers, 29 percent had a history of substance abuse, and only 27 percent had little or no substance abuse history. The three subgroups were similar in diagnosis, gender, and age at first hospitalization. However, the persistent substance abusers had a psychiatric hospitalization rate more than twice as high as the other two groups, and for these patients substance abuse frequently preceded hospitalization. The author recommends that consideration be given to routinely testing all hospitalized young adult chronic patients for drug and alcohol abuse. He also suggests using outside sources to obtain information on substance abuse, since most patients deny abuse. He stresses the need for more data on the physical and psychological effects of abused substances on the young mental patient.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)511-514
Number of pages4
JournalHospital and Community Psychiatry
Volume38
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1987
Externally publishedYes

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Substance-Related Disorders
Young Adult
Hospitalization
Psychiatry
Community Mental Health Centers
Mentally Ill Persons
Alcoholism
Psychology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Substance abuse by young adult chronic patients. / Safer, Daniel J.

In: Hospital and Community Psychiatry, Vol. 38, No. 5, 1987, p. 511-514.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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