Subjective sleep quality in women experiencing intimate partner violence: Contributions of situational, psychological, and physiological factors

Stephanie J. Woods, Sharon L. Kozachik, Rosalie J. Hall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study, guided by an adaptation of the theory of unpleasant symptoms, examined the complex relationships of childhood maltreatment, intimate partner violence (IPV), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and physical health symptoms with global sleep quality and disruptive nighttime behaviors. Data were analyzed using covariance structure analysis. A convenience sample of 157 women currently experiencing IPV was recruited from crisis shelters and community agencies. Findings provide empirical support that women concurrently experiencing PTSD, depression, and stress-related physical health symptoms demonstrated poor global sleep quality and frequent disruptive nighttime behaviors. Posttraumatic stress disorder and stress health symptoms functioned as mediators of childhood maltreatment and IPV effects on both global sleep quality and disruptive nighttime behaviors, but depression did not.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)141-150
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of traumatic stress
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Subjective sleep quality in women experiencing intimate partner violence: Contributions of situational, psychological, and physiological factors'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this