Subjective and physiologic effects of intravenous buprenorphine in humans

Wallace B. Pickworth, Rolley E. Johnson, Barbara A. Holicky, Edward J. Cone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The pharmacologic profile of sublingual and subcutaneous buprenorphine, a partial opioid agonist, indicates it may be useful as a maintenance drug in the treatment of opioid dependence. However, illicit intravenous self-administration suggests that it may have a greater abuse potential by this route of administration. Physiologic and subjective effects of intravenous buprenorphine (0.0, 0.3, 0.6, and 1.2 mg) were determined in a dose-escalation study in six nondependent volunteers with histories of opioid use. Buprenorphine caused miosis and decreased respiratory rate, increased diastolic blood pressure, and transiently increased heart rate. Buprenorphine increased positive responses on a "feel drug" question and scores on scales of "liking," "good effects," euphoria, and apathetic sedation. Physiologic and subjective responses were not consistently dose related, a finding compatable with the pharmacologic profile of a partial agonist. The findings indicate that buprenorphine has substantial potential for abuse when administered intravenously.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)570-576
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume53
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 1993

Fingerprint

Buprenorphine
Opioid Analgesics
Blood Pressure
Miosis
Self Administration
Respiratory Rate
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Intravenous Administration
Volunteers
Heart Rate
Maintenance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Pickworth, W. B., Johnson, R. E., Holicky, B. A., & Cone, E. J. (1993). Subjective and physiologic effects of intravenous buprenorphine in humans. Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 53(5), 570-576.

Subjective and physiologic effects of intravenous buprenorphine in humans. / Pickworth, Wallace B.; Johnson, Rolley E.; Holicky, Barbara A.; Cone, Edward J.

In: Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Vol. 53, No. 5, 05.1993, p. 570-576.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pickworth, WB, Johnson, RE, Holicky, BA & Cone, EJ 1993, 'Subjective and physiologic effects of intravenous buprenorphine in humans', Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, vol. 53, no. 5, pp. 570-576.
Pickworth WB, Johnson RE, Holicky BA, Cone EJ. Subjective and physiologic effects of intravenous buprenorphine in humans. Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 1993 May;53(5):570-576.
Pickworth, Wallace B. ; Johnson, Rolley E. ; Holicky, Barbara A. ; Cone, Edward J. / Subjective and physiologic effects of intravenous buprenorphine in humans. In: Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 1993 ; Vol. 53, No. 5. pp. 570-576.
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