Subclinical myocardial disease by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy in healthy HIV/Hepatitis C virus-coinfected persons

Kara W. Chew, Chia Ying Liu, Bharath Ambale-Venkatesh, Diana Liao, Tamara B. Horwich, João A.C. Lima, David A. Bluemke, J. Paul Finn, Adeel A. Butt, Judith S. Currier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: The contribution of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection to the risk of heart failure in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-coinfected persons is unknown. The objective was to characterize cardiac function and morphology in HIV-treated coinfected persons. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, HIV-infected patients virologically suppressed on antiretroviral therapy without known cardiovascular disease or diabetes mellitus underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy for measures of cardiac function, myocardial fibrosis, and steatosis. Results: The study included 18 male patients with a median age of 44 years. Of these, 10 had untreated HCV coinfection and eight had HIV monoinfection. Global systolic and diastolic function in the cohort were normal, and median myocardial fat content was 0.48% (interquartile range 0.35–1.54). Left ventricular (LV) mass index and LV mass/volume ratio were significantly greater in the HIV/HCV-coinfected group compared with the HIV-monoinfected group. In the HIV-monoinfected group, there was more myocardial fibrosis as measured by extracellular volume fraction. Conclusions: There were differences between HIV/HCV-coinfected and HIV-monoinfected patients in cardiac structure and morphology. Larger studies are needed to examine whether HIV and HCV independently contribute to mechanisms of heart failure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1693-1707
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of International Medical Research
Volume45
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Keywords

  • HIV
  • cardiac magnetic resonance imaging
  • heart disease
  • hepatitis C
  • magnetic resonance spectroscopy
  • myocardial fibrosis
  • myocardial steatosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Biochemistry, medical

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Subclinical myocardial disease by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy in healthy HIV/Hepatitis C virus-coinfected persons'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this