Studies on the role of oxygen radicals in asbestos-induced cytopathology of cultured human lung mesothelial cells

Edward Gabrielson, Gerald M. Rosen, Roland C. Grafstrom, Karyn E. Strauss, Curtis C. Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The possible role of oxygen radicals in mediating the cyto-pathologic effects of asbestos was studied using human mesothelial cells in culture. Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of intact cells using the spin trap 5, 5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-l-oxide failed to detect any increase in oxygen radicals in mesothelial cells after exposure to amosite asbestos, although oxygen radicals were readily detected in cells exposed to menadione, an uncoupler of oxidation reduction reactions. Cellular thiol levels were reduced after exposure to menadione, but were not affected by exposure to asbestos. Addition to the culture media of the free radical scavengers superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione, N-acetylcysteine, or D-α-tocopherol had no affect on the dose-dependent cyto-toxicity of amosite fibers. Furthermore, exposure of the mesothelial cells to amosite fibers resulted in no significant increase in the level of DNA single-strand breaks. These results all suggest that for cultured human mesothelial cells, oxygen free radicals are not important mediators of the cytopathic effect of asbestos.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1161-1164
Number of pages4
JournalCarcinogenesis
Volume7
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1986
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Asbestos
Lung
Amosite Asbestos
Oxygen
Reactive Oxygen Species
Cell
Vitamin K 3
Free radicals
Free Radicals
Acetylcysteine
Fibers
Redox reactions
Cytotoxicity
Single-Stranded DNA Breaks
Free Radical Scavengers
Electron Paramagnetic Resonance
Fiber
Tocopherols
Superoxide Dismutase
Paramagnetic resonance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Statistics, Probability and Uncertainty
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Physiology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Studies on the role of oxygen radicals in asbestos-induced cytopathology of cultured human lung mesothelial cells. / Gabrielson, Edward; Rosen, Gerald M.; Grafstrom, Roland C.; Strauss, Karyn E.; Harris, Curtis C.

In: Carcinogenesis, Vol. 7, No. 7, 07.1986, p. 1161-1164.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gabrielson, Edward ; Rosen, Gerald M. ; Grafstrom, Roland C. ; Strauss, Karyn E. ; Harris, Curtis C. / Studies on the role of oxygen radicals in asbestos-induced cytopathology of cultured human lung mesothelial cells. In: Carcinogenesis. 1986 ; Vol. 7, No. 7. pp. 1161-1164.
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