Studies on the mechanism of NK cell lysis

P. C. Quan, T. Ishizaka, B. R. Bloom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The mechanism of cytolysis by murine NK cells was analyzed using a variety of metabolic inhibitors that have proven informative in studying the lytic mechanism of CTL and the mechanism of histamine release by mast cells. Target cell binding occurred in the absence of calcium and was inhibited by only one of the agents studied, cytochalasin B. Lysis was initiated by addition of Ca2+ ions, as in the case of CTL. Subsequent to target cell binding, but prior to programming for lysis by Ca2+, NK cell lytic activity could be suppressed by inhibitors of chymotrypsin-like, but not trypsin-like proteases, in contrast to CTL. In addition, 3-deaza-SIBA, an inhibitor of transmethylation reactions and quinacrine, an inhibitor of phospholipase A2, appear to act before the Ca2+-dependent programming for lysis. Sr2+ ions blocked the lytic function, as did trifluoperazine (stelazine), the former presumably competing for ionic calcium, the latter known to block binding of Ca2+ to calmodulin. 8Br-cAMP and colchicine blocked later steps required for lysis. With the possible exception of trifluoperazine, all of the agents that blocked NK cell lysis are known to inhibit histamine release from mast cells. These results lend support to the stimulus-secretion model, originally proposed to explain the mechanism of CTL cytolysis, as relevent to the mechanism of lysis by NK cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1786-1791
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume128
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1982
Externally publishedYes

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Trifluoperazine
Natural Killer Cells
Histamine Release
Mast Cells
Ions
Calcium
Quinacrine
Cytochalasin B
Colchicine
Chymotrypsin
Calmodulin
Trypsin
Peptide Hydrolases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Quan, P. C., Ishizaka, T., & Bloom, B. R. (1982). Studies on the mechanism of NK cell lysis. Journal of Immunology, 128(4), 1786-1791.

Studies on the mechanism of NK cell lysis. / Quan, P. C.; Ishizaka, T.; Bloom, B. R.

In: Journal of Immunology, Vol. 128, No. 4, 1982, p. 1786-1791.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Quan, PC, Ishizaka, T & Bloom, BR 1982, 'Studies on the mechanism of NK cell lysis', Journal of Immunology, vol. 128, no. 4, pp. 1786-1791.
Quan PC, Ishizaka T, Bloom BR. Studies on the mechanism of NK cell lysis. Journal of Immunology. 1982;128(4):1786-1791.
Quan, P. C. ; Ishizaka, T. ; Bloom, B. R. / Studies on the mechanism of NK cell lysis. In: Journal of Immunology. 1982 ; Vol. 128, No. 4. pp. 1786-1791.
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