Studies of the human ascending pain pathways

Nirit Weiss, H. Christopher Lawson, Joel Daniel Greenspan, Shinji Ohara, Frederick Lenz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Chronic pain is an immense, unsolved, clinical problem. Current approaches to this condition are limited by uncertainty about mechanisms of acute and chronic pain in humans. Although much progress has been made toward understanding peripheral neural mechanisms of human nociception, we have a poor understanding of CNS pain mechanisms. Here, we review the anatomy and physiology of the ascending spinal pathways and supraspinal centers with pain-related activity. This review focuses on the primate nervous systems because there are significant differences between pain transmission in primates and other species such as cats and rats.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)71-86
Number of pages16
JournalThalamus and Related Systems
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005

Fingerprint

Chronic Pain
Primates
Pain Clinics
Pain
Nociception
Acute Pain
Nervous System
Uncertainty
Anatomy
Cats

Keywords

  • Cortex
  • Neurophysiology
  • Single-neuron recordings
  • Spinal cord
  • Thalamus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Studies of the human ascending pain pathways. / Weiss, Nirit; Lawson, H. Christopher; Greenspan, Joel Daniel; Ohara, Shinji; Lenz, Frederick.

In: Thalamus and Related Systems, Vol. 3, No. 1, 03.2005, p. 71-86.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weiss, Nirit ; Lawson, H. Christopher ; Greenspan, Joel Daniel ; Ohara, Shinji ; Lenz, Frederick. / Studies of the human ascending pain pathways. In: Thalamus and Related Systems. 2005 ; Vol. 3, No. 1. pp. 71-86.
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