Striatal and white matter predictors of estimated diagnosis for Huntington disease

Jane S. Paulsen, Peggy C. Nopoulos, Elizabeth Aylward, Christopher A. Ross, Hans Johnson, Vincent A. Magnotta, Andrew Juhl, Ronald K. Pierson, James Mills, Douglas Langbehn, Martha Nance

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Previous MRI studies with participants prior to manifest Huntington disease have been conducted in small single-site samples. The current study reports data from a systematic multi-national study during the prodromal period of Huntington disease and examines whether various brain structures make unique predictions about the proximity to manifest disease. MRI scans were acquired from 657 participants enrolled at 1 of 32 PREDICT-HD research sites. Only prodromal Huntington disease participants (those not meeting motor criteria for diagnosis) were included and subgrouped by estimated diagnosis proximity (Near, Mid, and Far) based upon a formula incorporating age and CAG-repeat length. Results show volumes of all three subgroups differed significantly from Controls for total brain tissue, cerebral spinal fluid, white matter, cortical gray matter, thalamus, caudate, and putamen. Total striatal volume demonstrated the largest differences between Controls and all three prodromal subgroups. Cerebral white matter offered additional independent power in the prediction of estimated proximity to diagnosis. In conclusion, this large cross-sectional study shows that changes in brain volume are detectable years to decades prior to estimated motor diagnosis of Huntington disease. This suggests that a clinical trial of a putative neuroprotective agent could begin as much as 15 years prior to estimated motor diagnosis in a cohort of persons at risk for but not meeting clinical motor diagnostic criteria for Huntington disease, and that neuroimaging (striatal and white matter volumes) may be among the best predictors of diagnosis proximity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)201-207
Number of pages7
JournalBrain Research Bulletin
Volume82
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2010

Keywords

  • Clinical trials
  • Huntington disease
  • MRI
  • Observational study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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