Stress-specific signatures: Expression profiling of p53 wild-type and -null human cells

Sally A. Amundson, Khanh T. Do, Lisa Vinikoor, Christine A. Koch-Paiz, Michael L. Bittner, Jeffrey M. Trent, Paul Meltzer, Albert J. Fornace

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Gene expression responses of human cell lines exposed to a diverse set of stress agents were compared by cDNA microarray hybridization. The B-lymphoblastoid cell line TK6 (p53 wild-type) and its p53-null derivative, NH32, were treated in parallel to facilitate investigation of p53-dependent responses. RNA was extracted 4 h after the beginning of treatment when no notable decrease in cell viability was evident in the cultures. Gene expression signatures were defined that discriminated between four broad general mechanisms of stress agents: Non-DNA-damaging stresses (heat shock, osmotic shock, and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate), agents causing mainly oxidative stress (arsenite and hydrogen peroxide), ionizing radiations (neutron and γ-ray exposures), and other DNA-damaging agents (ultraviolet radiation, methyl methane-sulfonate, adriamycin, camptothecin, and cis-Platinum(II)diammine dichloride (cisplatin)). Within this data set, non-DNA-damaging stresses could be discriminated from all DNA-damaging stresses, and profiles for individual agents were also defined. While DNA-damaging stresses showed a strong p53-dependent element in their responses, no discernible p53-dependent responses were triggered by the non-DNA-damaging stresses. A set of 16 genes did exhibit a robust p53-dependent pattern of induction in response to all nine DNA-damaging agents, however.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4572-4579
Number of pages8
JournalOncogene
Volume24
Issue number28
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 30 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Null Lymphocytes
DNA
Cell Line
Camptothecin
Osmotic Pressure
Methane
Neutrons
Tetradecanoylphorbol Acetate
Ionizing Radiation
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Transcriptome
Doxorubicin
Hydrogen Peroxide
Cisplatin
Shock
Cell Survival
Oxidative Stress
Hot Temperature
RNA
Radiation

Keywords

  • cDNA microarray
  • DNA damage
  • Heavy metals
  • p53

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cancer Research
  • Genetics

Cite this

Amundson, S. A., Do, K. T., Vinikoor, L., Koch-Paiz, C. A., Bittner, M. L., Trent, J. M., ... Fornace, A. J. (2005). Stress-specific signatures: Expression profiling of p53 wild-type and -null human cells. Oncogene, 24(28), 4572-4579. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.onc.1208653

Stress-specific signatures : Expression profiling of p53 wild-type and -null human cells. / Amundson, Sally A.; Do, Khanh T.; Vinikoor, Lisa; Koch-Paiz, Christine A.; Bittner, Michael L.; Trent, Jeffrey M.; Meltzer, Paul; Fornace, Albert J.

In: Oncogene, Vol. 24, No. 28, 30.06.2005, p. 4572-4579.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Amundson, SA, Do, KT, Vinikoor, L, Koch-Paiz, CA, Bittner, ML, Trent, JM, Meltzer, P & Fornace, AJ 2005, 'Stress-specific signatures: Expression profiling of p53 wild-type and -null human cells', Oncogene, vol. 24, no. 28, pp. 4572-4579. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.onc.1208653
Amundson SA, Do KT, Vinikoor L, Koch-Paiz CA, Bittner ML, Trent JM et al. Stress-specific signatures: Expression profiling of p53 wild-type and -null human cells. Oncogene. 2005 Jun 30;24(28):4572-4579. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.onc.1208653
Amundson, Sally A. ; Do, Khanh T. ; Vinikoor, Lisa ; Koch-Paiz, Christine A. ; Bittner, Michael L. ; Trent, Jeffrey M. ; Meltzer, Paul ; Fornace, Albert J. / Stress-specific signatures : Expression profiling of p53 wild-type and -null human cells. In: Oncogene. 2005 ; Vol. 24, No. 28. pp. 4572-4579.
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