Stress, mental health, and job performance among active duty military personnel: Findings from the 2002 department of defense health-related behaviors survey

Laurel L. Hourani, Thomas V. Williams, Amii M. Kress

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined the extent to which high levels of occupational and family stress were associated with mental health problems and productivity loss among active duty military personnel. We analyzed data from the 2002 Department of Defense Survey of Health-Related Behaviors among Military Personnel, which provided extensive population-based information on 12,756 active duty personnel in all branches of the military worldwide. Military personnel reported higher levels of stress at work than in their family life. The personnel reporting the highest levels of occupational stress were those 25 or younger, those who were married with spouses not present, and women. Personnel with high levels of stress had significantly higher rates of mental health problems and productivity loss than those with less stress. We recommend that prevention and intervention efforts geared toward personnel reporting the highest levels of stress be given priority for resources in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)849-856
Number of pages8
JournalMilitary medicine
Volume171
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2006
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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