Stress among Black women in a South African township: The protective role of religion

Nikeea Copeland-Linder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Communities that have been exposed to high levels of stress and where religiosity is salient are ideal contexts in which to examine the role of religion in stress processes. The present study examines the protective function of religiosity among Black women in a South African township. The women (N = 172) were interviewed about sources of stress, religiosity, depressive symptomatology, and physical health problems. The results revealed that engagement informal religion buffered the aggregate effects of multiple stressors (cumulative stress), as well as the effects of work stress and experiencing racism on physical health. Prayer also buffered the effects of work stress on physical health and reduced the deleterious effects of work stress and experiencing racism on depressive symptomatology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)577-599
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of community psychology
Volume34
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Stress among Black women in a South African township: The protective role of religion'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this