Strategies to prevent weight gain in workplace and college settings: A systematic review

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To compare the effectiveness of self-management, dietary, physical activity, and/or environmental strategies for the prevention of weight gain among adults in work and college settings. Method: We conducted a systematic review of work/college-based studies that intervened on adults using one or more of the above strategies with follow up over at least a 12-month period. We excluded studies with a weight loss component. Our weight outcomes included body mass index (BMI), weight, and waist circumference. Results: We included 7 work- and 2 college-based interventional studies, which all used combinations of different strategies. There was moderate strength of evidence that work/college-based combination interventions prevented weight gain of ≥. 0.5. kg over 12. months as compared to control; however, we were unable to perform meta-analysis due to substantial heterogeneity in the intervention strategies and study populations. These programs did not prevent BMI gain or waist circumference increase. Conclusion: While we found limited evidence that work/college-based interventions employing a combination of strategies prevent adult weight gain, the combination of personalized diet and physical activity counseling for the individual along with the promotion of healthy lifestyle changes in the environment may be a promising strategy to explore in future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)268-277
Number of pages10
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume57
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2013

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Workplace
Weight Gain
Waist Circumference
Body Mass Index
Weights and Measures
Self Care
Meta-Analysis
Counseling
Weight Loss
Diet
Population

Keywords

  • Obesity
  • Primary prevention
  • Review
  • Student health services
  • Workplace

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

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title = "Strategies to prevent weight gain in workplace and college settings: A systematic review",
abstract = "Objective: To compare the effectiveness of self-management, dietary, physical activity, and/or environmental strategies for the prevention of weight gain among adults in work and college settings. Method: We conducted a systematic review of work/college-based studies that intervened on adults using one or more of the above strategies with follow up over at least a 12-month period. We excluded studies with a weight loss component. Our weight outcomes included body mass index (BMI), weight, and waist circumference. Results: We included 7 work- and 2 college-based interventional studies, which all used combinations of different strategies. There was moderate strength of evidence that work/college-based combination interventions prevented weight gain of ≥. 0.5. kg over 12. months as compared to control; however, we were unable to perform meta-analysis due to substantial heterogeneity in the intervention strategies and study populations. These programs did not prevent BMI gain or waist circumference increase. Conclusion: While we found limited evidence that work/college-based interventions employing a combination of strategies prevent adult weight gain, the combination of personalized diet and physical activity counseling for the individual along with the promotion of healthy lifestyle changes in the environment may be a promising strategy to explore in future research.",
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