Strategies to improve monitoring disease progression, assessing cardiovascular risk, and defining prognostic biomarkers in chronic kidney disease

Michelle J. Pena, Peter Stenvinkel, Matthias Kretzler, Dwomoa Adu, Sanjay Kumar Agarwal, Josef Coresh, Harold I. Feldman, Agnes B. Fogo, Ron T. Gansevoort, David C. Harris, Vivekanand Jha, Zhi Hong Liu, Valerie A. Luyckx, Ziad A. Massy, Ravindra Mehta, Robert G. Nelson, Donal J. O'Donoghue, Gregorio T. Obrador, Charlotte J. Roberts, Laura SolaErnest K. Sumaili, Sajja Tatiyanupanwong, Bernadette Thomas, Andrzej Wiecek, Chirag R. Parikh, Hiddo J.L. Heerspink

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major global public health problem with significant gaps in research, care, and policy. In order to mitigate the risks and adverse effects of CKD, the International Society of Nephrology has created a cohesive set of activities to improve the global outcomes of people living with CKD. Improving monitoring of renal disease progression can be done by screening and monitoring albuminuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate in primary care. Consensus on how many times and how often albuminuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate are measured should be defined. Meaningful changes in both renal biomarkers should be determined in order to ascertain what is clinically relevant. Increasing social awareness of CKD and partnering with the technological community may be ways to engage patients. Furthermore, improving the prediction of cardiovascular events in patients with CKD can be achieved by including the renal risk markers albuminuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate in cardiovascular risk algorithms and by encouraging uptake of assessing cardiovascular risk by general practitioners and nephrologists. Finally, examining ways to further validate and implement novel biomarkers for CKD will help mitigate the global problem of CKD. The more frequent use of renal biopsy will facilitate further knowledge into the underlying etiologies of CKD and help put new biomarkers into biological context. Real-world assessments of these biomarkers in existing cohorts is important, as well as obtaining regulatory approval to use these biomarkers in clinical practice. Collaborations among academia, physician and patient groups, industry, payer organizations, and regulatory authorities will help improve the global outcomes of people living with CKD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)107-113
Number of pages7
JournalKidney International Supplements
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2017

Keywords

  • cardiovascular disease prevention
  • chronic kidney disease
  • monitoring
  • novel biomarkers
  • renal disease progression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

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