'Sternberg Reed' giant cells of Hodgkin's disease: Cultivation in vitro, heterotransplantation, and characterization as neoplastic macrophages

H. S. Kaplan, S. Gartner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Cells from the involved spleens of 25 patients with Hodgkin's disease were grown in long-term culture and compared with normal spleen macrophage cultures from control cases. The Hodgkin's spleen cell culture contained mono-, bi-, and multinucleate giant cells, many closely resembling Sternberg-Reed cells, which were adherent, phagocytically active and neoplastic by the dual criteria of aneuplody and heterotransplantability. Lysozyme secretion was consistently observed in all Hodgkin's cultures tested. The giant cells possessed both Fc and complement (C3b) receptors, and lacked lymphocyte markers such as C3d receptors, surface IgM, and the capacity to form E-rosettes. Binucleate and multinucleate cells, as well as mononuclears, were capable of active DNA synthesis, and binuclear mitotic figures were observed. It is concluded that these cells are the in vitro descendants of the Sternberg-Reed and Hodgkin neoplastic cell population, and that they are derived from macrophages or closely related cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system. Although these giant cells are as a rule referred to as Sternberg-Reed cells, it is now recognized that Tuckwell and others (historical review by Rather, 1972) described them as long as 30 yr before Sternberg (1898) and Reed (1902).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)511-525
Number of pages15
JournalInternational Journal of Cancer
Volume19
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1977
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Reed-Sternberg Cells
Giant Cells
Hodgkin Disease
Macrophages
Spleen
Complement 3d Receptors
Complement 3b Receptors
Complement C3b
Complement Receptors
Mononuclear Phagocyte System
Muramidase
Immunoglobulin M
Cell Culture Techniques
In Vitro Techniques
Lymphocytes
DNA
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

'Sternberg Reed' giant cells of Hodgkin's disease : Cultivation in vitro, heterotransplantation, and characterization as neoplastic macrophages. / Kaplan, H. S.; Gartner, S.

In: International Journal of Cancer, Vol. 19, No. 4, 1977, p. 511-525.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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