Stereotypic movement disorders

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Stereotypic movements are repetitive, rhythmic, fixed, patterned in form, amplitude, and localization, but purposeless (e.g., hand shaking, waving, body rocking, head nodding). They are commonly seen in children; both in normal children (primary stereotypy) and in individuals with additional behavioral or neurological signs and symptoms (secondary stereotypy). They should be differentiated from compulsions (OCD), tics (tic disorders), trichotillomania, skin picking disorder, or the direct physiological effect of a substance. There is increasing evidence to support a neurobiological mechanism. Response to behavioral and pharmacological therapies is variable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)631-639
Number of pages9
JournalHandbook of clinical neurology
Volume100
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 20 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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