Stem-cell therapy for diabetes mellitus

Mehboob Hussain, Neil D. Theise

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Context Curative therapy for diabetes mellitus mainly implies replacement of functional insulin-producing pancreatic β cells, with pancreas or islet-cell transplants. However, shortage of donor organs spurs research into alternative means of generating β cells from islet expansion, encapsulated islet xenografts, human islet cell-lines, and stem cells. Stem-cell therapy here implies the replacement of diseased or lost cells from progeny of pluripotent or multipotent cells. Both embryonic stem cells (derived from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst) and adult stem cells (found in the postnatal organism) have been used to generate surrogate β cells or otherwise restore β-cell functioning. Starting point Recently, Andreas Lechner and colleagues failed to see transdifferentiation into pancreatic β cells after transplantation of bone-marrow cells into mice (Diabetes 2004; 53: 616-23). Last year, Jayaraj Rajagopal and colleagues failed to derive β cells from embryonic stem cells (Science 2003; 299: 363). However, others have seen such effects. Where next? As in every emerging field in biology, early reports seem confusing and conflicting. Embryonic and adult stem cells are potential sources for β-cell replacement and merit further scientific investigation. Discrepancies between different results need to be reconciled. Fundamental processes in determining the differentiation pathways of stem cells remain to be elucidated, so that rigorous and reliable differentiation protocols can be established. Encouraging studies in rodent models may ultimately set the stage for large-animal studies and translational investigation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)203-209
Number of pages7
JournalThe Lancet
Volume364
Issue number9429
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 10 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Diabetes Mellitus
Stem Cells
Embryonic Stem Cells
Islets of Langerhans
Adult Stem Cells
Blastocyst Inner Cell Mass
Cell Transplantation
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Heterografts
Pancreas
Rodentia
Tissue Donors
Insulin
Transplants
Cell Line
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Stem-cell therapy for diabetes mellitus. / Hussain, Mehboob; Theise, Neil D.

In: The Lancet, Vol. 364, No. 9429, 10.07.2004, p. 203-209.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hussain, Mehboob ; Theise, Neil D. / Stem-cell therapy for diabetes mellitus. In: The Lancet. 2004 ; Vol. 364, No. 9429. pp. 203-209.
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