Statins and Incident Diabetes

Can Risk Outweigh Benefit?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We review the most recent data regarding the association of incident diabetes and statin use, examine potential mechanisms to explain this association, and compare the potential risk of diabetes with the known cardiovascular benefits derived from statin use. We discuss new and interesting findings, as well as significant trends and developments. The risk of statin-induced dysglycemia and diabetes appears to be dose-dependent, but generally small in magnitude and confined to an unmasking of a strong predisposition to diabetes or accelerated diagnosis in individuals with diabetes risk factors. We focus on the concept of net benefit and find that although risk of diabetes could outweigh cardiovascular benefits in select individuals at low cardiovascular risk, the vast majority of people being managed for cardiovascular risk are most likely to derive net benefit. The need to weigh risks and benefits highlights the importance of shared decision-making in clinician-patient risk discussions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCurrent Cardiovascular Risk Reports
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Diabetes
  • Guidelines
  • HMG Co-A reductase inhibition
  • Hypercholesterolemia
  • Hyperglycemia
  • Insulin resistance
  • Statins
  • Treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Statins and Incident Diabetes : Can Risk Outweigh Benefit? / Florido, Roberta; Elander, Annie; Blumenthal, Roger S; Martin, Seth.

In: Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports, Vol. 9, No. 4, 2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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