State-of-the-science workshop report: Issues and approaches in low-dose-response extrapolation for environmental health risk assessment

Ronald White, Ila Cote, Lauren Zeise, Mary A Fox, Francesca Dominici, Thomas Burke, Paul D. White, Dale B. Hattis, Jonathan M. Samet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Low-dose extrapolation model selection for evaluating the health effects of environmental pollutants is a key component of the risk assessment process. At a workshop held in Baltimore, Maryland, on 23-24 April 2007, sponsored by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Johns Hopkins Risk Sciences and Public Policy Institute, a multidisciplinary group of experts reviewed the state of the science regarding low-dose extrapolation modeling and its application in environmental health risk assessments. Participants identified discussion topics based on a literature review, which included examples for which human responses to ambient exposures have been extensively characterized for cancer and/or noncancer outcomes. Topics included the need for formalized approaches and criteria to assess the evidence for mode of action (MOA), the use of human versus animal data, the use of MOA information in biologically based models, and the implications of interindividual variability, background disease processes, and background exposures in threshold versus nonthreshold model choice. Participants recommended approaches that differ from current practice for extrapolating high-dose animal data to low-dose human exposures, including categorical approaches for integrating information on MOA, statistical approaches such as model averaging, and inference-based models that explicitly consider uncertainty and interindividual variability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)283-287
Number of pages5
JournalEnvironmental Health Perspectives
Volume117
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

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Environmental Health
Education
United States Environmental Protection Agency
Environmental Pollutants
Baltimore
Public Policy
Uncertainty
Health
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Dose-response function
  • Environmental health
  • Low-dose entrapolation
  • Risk assessment
  • Workshop report

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

State-of-the-science workshop report : Issues and approaches in low-dose-response extrapolation for environmental health risk assessment. / White, Ronald; Cote, Ila; Zeise, Lauren; Fox, Mary A; Dominici, Francesca; Burke, Thomas; White, Paul D.; Hattis, Dale B.; Samet, Jonathan M.

In: Environmental Health Perspectives, Vol. 117, No. 2, 2009, p. 283-287.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

White, Ronald ; Cote, Ila ; Zeise, Lauren ; Fox, Mary A ; Dominici, Francesca ; Burke, Thomas ; White, Paul D. ; Hattis, Dale B. ; Samet, Jonathan M. / State-of-the-science workshop report : Issues and approaches in low-dose-response extrapolation for environmental health risk assessment. In: Environmental Health Perspectives. 2009 ; Vol. 117, No. 2. pp. 283-287.
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