Stanford-Binet and WAIS IQ differences and their implications for adults with intellectual disability (aka mental retardation)

Wayne Silverman, Charles Miezejeski, Robert Ryan, Warren Zigman, Sharon Krinsky-McHale, Tiina Urv

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Stanford-Binet and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) IQs were compared for a group of 74 adults with intellectual disability (ID). In every case, WAIS Full Scale IQ was higher than the Stanford-Binet Composite IQ, with a mean difference of 16.7 points. These differences did not appear to be due to the lower minimum possible score for the Stanford-Binet. Additional comparisons with other measures suggested that the WAIS might systematically underestimate severity of intellectual impairment. Implications of these findings are discussed regarding determination of disability status, estimating prevalence of ID, assessing dementia and aging-related cognitive declines, and diagnosis of ID in forensic cases involving a possible death penalty.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)242-248
Number of pages7
JournalIntelligence
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2010

Keywords

  • IQ
  • Intellectual disability
  • Intelligence testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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