SRS-22r legacy scores can be accurately translated to PROMIS scores in adult spinal deformity patients

Alvaro Ibaseta, Rafa Rahman, Richard Skolasky, Jay S. Reidler, Khaled M Kebaish, Brian J Neuman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) facilitates comparisons of treatment effectiveness across populations and diseases. In adult spinal deformity (ASD), the disease-specific Scoliosis Research Society-22r (SRS-22r) tool assesses outcomes. Existing data must be translated to PROMIS to make comparisons. PURPOSE: To develop and validate a method to translate SRS-22r scores to PROMIS scores in surgical ASD patients. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. PATIENT SAMPLE: A total of 158 ASD surgery patients from an ongoing registry of patients who underwent spine surgery at a tertiary care center from 2015 to 2017 were included. OUTCOME MEASURES: PROMIS and SRS-22r questionnaires were completed at 387 visits (150 preoperative [derivation sample]; 237 postoperative [validation sample]). METHODS: Using the derivation sample, we modeled PROMIS domains as functions of age and SRS-22r domains using linear regression. The most parsimonious model was selected. In the validation cohort, we used the derived regression equations to estimate PROMIS scores from SRS-22r scores. RESULTS: The following significant associations were found (p<.001): PROMIS Pain Interference is dependent on age and SRS-22r Pain, Physical Function, and Patient Satisfaction; PROMIS Physical Function is dependent on age and SRS-22r Pain and Physical Function; PROMIS Anxiety is dependent on SRS-22r Mental Health; PROMIS Depression is dependent on age and SRS-22r Mental Health; and PROMIS Satisfaction with Social Roles is dependent on age and SRS-22r Pain, Physical Function (p=.011), Mental Health, and Patient Satisfaction. Correlations were strong to very strong between estimated and actual PROMIS scores in the validation cohort (p<.001): Pain Interference, r=0.78; Physical Function, r=0.66; Anxiety, r=0.83; Depression, r=0.80; and Satisfaction with Social Roles, r=0.71. CONCLUSIONS: PROMIS scores estimated from SRS-22r scores using our model correlate strongly with actual PROMIS scores. SRS-22r scores may be translated to PROMIS scores in all evaluated domains for ASD patients. Orthopedic surgeons can use this method to compare legacy measures with PROMIS scores.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSpine Journal
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Scoliosis
Information Systems
Research
Pain
Mental Health
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Patient Satisfaction
Anxiety
Spinal Diseases
Depression
Mentally Ill Persons
Tertiary Care Centers
Registries

Keywords

  • Adult spinal deformity
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • III
  • Keywords
  • Pain
  • Patient-reported outcomes
  • Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System
  • Physical function
  • Satisfaction with participation in social roles
  • Scoliosis Research Society-22r questionnaire
  • Spine surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

SRS-22r legacy scores can be accurately translated to PROMIS scores in adult spinal deformity patients. / Ibaseta, Alvaro; Rahman, Rafa; Skolasky, Richard; Reidler, Jay S.; Kebaish, Khaled M; Neuman, Brian J.

In: Spine Journal, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) facilitates comparisons of treatment effectiveness across populations and diseases. In adult spinal deformity (ASD), the disease-specific Scoliosis Research Society-22r (SRS-22r) tool assesses outcomes. Existing data must be translated to PROMIS to make comparisons. PURPOSE: To develop and validate a method to translate SRS-22r scores to PROMIS scores in surgical ASD patients. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. PATIENT SAMPLE: A total of 158 ASD surgery patients from an ongoing registry of patients who underwent spine surgery at a tertiary care center from 2015 to 2017 were included. OUTCOME MEASURES: PROMIS and SRS-22r questionnaires were completed at 387 visits (150 preoperative [derivation sample]; 237 postoperative [validation sample]). METHODS: Using the derivation sample, we modeled PROMIS domains as functions of age and SRS-22r domains using linear regression. The most parsimonious model was selected. In the validation cohort, we used the derived regression equations to estimate PROMIS scores from SRS-22r scores. RESULTS: The following significant associations were found (p<.001): PROMIS Pain Interference is dependent on age and SRS-22r Pain, Physical Function, and Patient Satisfaction; PROMIS Physical Function is dependent on age and SRS-22r Pain and Physical Function; PROMIS Anxiety is dependent on SRS-22r Mental Health; PROMIS Depression is dependent on age and SRS-22r Mental Health; and PROMIS Satisfaction with Social Roles is dependent on age and SRS-22r Pain, Physical Function (p=.011), Mental Health, and Patient Satisfaction. Correlations were strong to very strong between estimated and actual PROMIS scores in the validation cohort (p<.001): Pain Interference, r=0.78; Physical Function, r=0.66; Anxiety, r=0.83; Depression, r=0.80; and Satisfaction with Social Roles, r=0.71. CONCLUSIONS: PROMIS scores estimated from SRS-22r scores using our model correlate strongly with actual PROMIS scores. SRS-22r scores may be translated to PROMIS scores in all evaluated domains for ASD patients. Orthopedic surgeons can use this method to compare legacy measures with PROMIS scores.",
keywords = "Adult spinal deformity, Anxiety, Depression, III, Keywords, Pain, Patient-reported outcomes, Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System, Physical function, Satisfaction with participation in social roles, Scoliosis Research Society-22r questionnaire, Spine surgery",
author = "Alvaro Ibaseta and Rafa Rahman and Richard Skolasky and Reidler, {Jay S.} and Kebaish, {Khaled M} and Neuman, {Brian J}",
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language = "English (US)",
journal = "Spine Journal",
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T1 - SRS-22r legacy scores can be accurately translated to PROMIS scores in adult spinal deformity patients

AU - Ibaseta, Alvaro

AU - Rahman, Rafa

AU - Skolasky, Richard

AU - Reidler, Jay S.

AU - Kebaish, Khaled M

AU - Neuman, Brian J

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) facilitates comparisons of treatment effectiveness across populations and diseases. In adult spinal deformity (ASD), the disease-specific Scoliosis Research Society-22r (SRS-22r) tool assesses outcomes. Existing data must be translated to PROMIS to make comparisons. PURPOSE: To develop and validate a method to translate SRS-22r scores to PROMIS scores in surgical ASD patients. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. PATIENT SAMPLE: A total of 158 ASD surgery patients from an ongoing registry of patients who underwent spine surgery at a tertiary care center from 2015 to 2017 were included. OUTCOME MEASURES: PROMIS and SRS-22r questionnaires were completed at 387 visits (150 preoperative [derivation sample]; 237 postoperative [validation sample]). METHODS: Using the derivation sample, we modeled PROMIS domains as functions of age and SRS-22r domains using linear regression. The most parsimonious model was selected. In the validation cohort, we used the derived regression equations to estimate PROMIS scores from SRS-22r scores. RESULTS: The following significant associations were found (p<.001): PROMIS Pain Interference is dependent on age and SRS-22r Pain, Physical Function, and Patient Satisfaction; PROMIS Physical Function is dependent on age and SRS-22r Pain and Physical Function; PROMIS Anxiety is dependent on SRS-22r Mental Health; PROMIS Depression is dependent on age and SRS-22r Mental Health; and PROMIS Satisfaction with Social Roles is dependent on age and SRS-22r Pain, Physical Function (p=.011), Mental Health, and Patient Satisfaction. Correlations were strong to very strong between estimated and actual PROMIS scores in the validation cohort (p<.001): Pain Interference, r=0.78; Physical Function, r=0.66; Anxiety, r=0.83; Depression, r=0.80; and Satisfaction with Social Roles, r=0.71. CONCLUSIONS: PROMIS scores estimated from SRS-22r scores using our model correlate strongly with actual PROMIS scores. SRS-22r scores may be translated to PROMIS scores in all evaluated domains for ASD patients. Orthopedic surgeons can use this method to compare legacy measures with PROMIS scores.

AB - BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) facilitates comparisons of treatment effectiveness across populations and diseases. In adult spinal deformity (ASD), the disease-specific Scoliosis Research Society-22r (SRS-22r) tool assesses outcomes. Existing data must be translated to PROMIS to make comparisons. PURPOSE: To develop and validate a method to translate SRS-22r scores to PROMIS scores in surgical ASD patients. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. PATIENT SAMPLE: A total of 158 ASD surgery patients from an ongoing registry of patients who underwent spine surgery at a tertiary care center from 2015 to 2017 were included. OUTCOME MEASURES: PROMIS and SRS-22r questionnaires were completed at 387 visits (150 preoperative [derivation sample]; 237 postoperative [validation sample]). METHODS: Using the derivation sample, we modeled PROMIS domains as functions of age and SRS-22r domains using linear regression. The most parsimonious model was selected. In the validation cohort, we used the derived regression equations to estimate PROMIS scores from SRS-22r scores. RESULTS: The following significant associations were found (p<.001): PROMIS Pain Interference is dependent on age and SRS-22r Pain, Physical Function, and Patient Satisfaction; PROMIS Physical Function is dependent on age and SRS-22r Pain and Physical Function; PROMIS Anxiety is dependent on SRS-22r Mental Health; PROMIS Depression is dependent on age and SRS-22r Mental Health; and PROMIS Satisfaction with Social Roles is dependent on age and SRS-22r Pain, Physical Function (p=.011), Mental Health, and Patient Satisfaction. Correlations were strong to very strong between estimated and actual PROMIS scores in the validation cohort (p<.001): Pain Interference, r=0.78; Physical Function, r=0.66; Anxiety, r=0.83; Depression, r=0.80; and Satisfaction with Social Roles, r=0.71. CONCLUSIONS: PROMIS scores estimated from SRS-22r scores using our model correlate strongly with actual PROMIS scores. SRS-22r scores may be translated to PROMIS scores in all evaluated domains for ASD patients. Orthopedic surgeons can use this method to compare legacy measures with PROMIS scores.

KW - Adult spinal deformity

KW - Anxiety

KW - Depression

KW - III

KW - Keywords

KW - Pain

KW - Patient-reported outcomes

KW - Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System

KW - Physical function

KW - Satisfaction with participation in social roles

KW - Scoliosis Research Society-22r questionnaire

KW - Spine surgery

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