Squamous cell carcinomas in patients with Fanconi anemia and dyskeratosis congenita: A search for human papillomavirus

Blanche P. Alter, Neelam Giri, Sharon A. Savage, Wim G V Quint, Maurits N C De Koning, Mark Schiffman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) and dyskeratosis congenita (DC) are at high risk of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) and anogenital squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). In the general population, these sites (particularly oropharyngeal SCC) may be associated with infection with human papillomavirus (HPV). In FA and DC, however, the majority of HNSCC occur in the oral cavity. We investigated the HPV status of HNSCC and vulvar SCC from nine patients with FA and four with DC using a very sensitive PCR assay, and found HPV16 DNA in only a single vulvar tumor from one patient with FA, and in none of the HNSCC. These results suggest that HPV may not be the cause of SCC in patients with FA or DC, and that vaccination may not reduce the incidence of HNSCC in these patients. What's new? The incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity and gynecologic tract in patients with Fanconi anemia suggests a link to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. However, the possibility of an association has not been studied extensively, and studies that have been conducted have produced conflicting results. This analysis of tumors from patients with Fanconi anemia or dyskeratosis congenita yielded no evidence for HPV causality, indicating that HPV vaccination may not reduce the incidence of SCC in these patients. The findings warrant etiological investigation into non-HPV mechanisms of SCC in these populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1513-1515
Number of pages3
JournalInternational Journal of Cancer
Volume133
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dyskeratosis Congenita
Fanconi Anemia
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Mouth
Incidence
Vaccination
Papillomavirus Infections
Causality
Population
Neoplasms
Carcinoma, squamous cell of head and neck
Polymerase Chain Reaction

Keywords

  • dyskeratosis congenita
  • Fanconi anemia
  • human papillomavirus
  • squamous cell carcinoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Alter, B. P., Giri, N., Savage, S. A., Quint, W. G. V., De Koning, M. N. C., & Schiffman, M. (2013). Squamous cell carcinomas in patients with Fanconi anemia and dyskeratosis congenita: A search for human papillomavirus. International Journal of Cancer, 133(6), 1513-1515. https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.28157

Squamous cell carcinomas in patients with Fanconi anemia and dyskeratosis congenita : A search for human papillomavirus. / Alter, Blanche P.; Giri, Neelam; Savage, Sharon A.; Quint, Wim G V; De Koning, Maurits N C; Schiffman, Mark.

In: International Journal of Cancer, Vol. 133, No. 6, 15.09.2013, p. 1513-1515.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alter, Blanche P. ; Giri, Neelam ; Savage, Sharon A. ; Quint, Wim G V ; De Koning, Maurits N C ; Schiffman, Mark. / Squamous cell carcinomas in patients with Fanconi anemia and dyskeratosis congenita : A search for human papillomavirus. In: International Journal of Cancer. 2013 ; Vol. 133, No. 6. pp. 1513-1515.
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