Spring-mediated mandibular distraction osteogenesis.

Mehrdad M. Mofid, Nozomu Inoue, Anthony P. Tufaro, Craig A. Vander Kolk, Paul N. Manson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Successful performance of distraction osteogenesis requires rigorous patient compliance with a daily activation regimen of a percutaneous screw. Previous clinical studies have found that failure of patient compliance with this regimen is the most common complication leading to technical failure of the distraction process. The authors have developed an internalized spring-mediated device for mandibular distraction osteogenesis that can potentially abrogate the risks associated with patient compliance by allowing for automated distraction across an osteotomy. Twenty adult New Zealand White rabbits underwent unilateral mandibular osteotomy. A segment of nickel-titanium shape memory alloy reinforced at both ends with a pinball was fashioned into an inferiorly based arc and secured to the mandible with stainless steel wire. On postoperative day 12, spring activation commenced by cutting a wire binding the two pinballs to one another. Animals were observed for 6 weeks before they were killed. Radiographic studies and decalcified histologic analysis were performed on extracted mandibles. Temperature- and displacement-dependent properties of the shape memory alloy were also examined. Five animals were excluded from the study due to infection, nonunion, or device failure. A mean distraction of 1.2 mm in the distracted hemimandible relative to the nonoperated hemimandible was found (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)756-762
Number of pages7
JournalThe Journal of craniofacial surgery
Volume14
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 2003

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Distraction Osteogenesis
Patient Compliance
Mandible
Mandibular Osteotomy
Equipment Failure
Stainless Steel
Osteotomy
Rabbits
Equipment and Supplies
Temperature
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Mofid, M. M., Inoue, N., Tufaro, A. P., Vander Kolk, C. A., & Manson, P. N. (2003). Spring-mediated mandibular distraction osteogenesis. The Journal of craniofacial surgery, 14(5), 756-762.

Spring-mediated mandibular distraction osteogenesis. / Mofid, Mehrdad M.; Inoue, Nozomu; Tufaro, Anthony P.; Vander Kolk, Craig A.; Manson, Paul N.

In: The Journal of craniofacial surgery, Vol. 14, No. 5, 09.2003, p. 756-762.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mofid, MM, Inoue, N, Tufaro, AP, Vander Kolk, CA & Manson, PN 2003, 'Spring-mediated mandibular distraction osteogenesis.', The Journal of craniofacial surgery, vol. 14, no. 5, pp. 756-762.
Mofid MM, Inoue N, Tufaro AP, Vander Kolk CA, Manson PN. Spring-mediated mandibular distraction osteogenesis. The Journal of craniofacial surgery. 2003 Sep;14(5):756-762.
Mofid, Mehrdad M. ; Inoue, Nozomu ; Tufaro, Anthony P. ; Vander Kolk, Craig A. ; Manson, Paul N. / Spring-mediated mandibular distraction osteogenesis. In: The Journal of craniofacial surgery. 2003 ; Vol. 14, No. 5. pp. 756-762.
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