Spray

Single-donor plasma product for room temperature storage

Garrett S. Booth, Jay N. Lozier, Khanh Nghiem, Douglas Clibourn, Harvey G. Klein, Willy A. Flegel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Spray-drying techniques are commonly utilized in the pharmaceutical, dairy, and animal feed industries for processing liquids into powders but have not been applied to human blood products. Spray-dried protein products are known to maintain stability during storage at room temperature. Study design and methods: Plasma units collected at the donor facility were shipped overnight at room temperature to a processing facility where single-use spray drying occurred. After 48 hours' storage at room temperature, the spray-dried plasma product was split in two and rehydrated with 1.5% glycine or deionized water and assayed for chemistry analytes and coagulation factors. Matched fresh-frozen plasma was analyzed in parallel as controls. Results: Reconstitution was achieved for both rehydration groups within 5 minutes (n = 6). There was no significant intergroup difference in recovery for total protein, albumin, immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgA, and IgM (96% or higher). With the exception of Factor VIII (58%), the recovery of clotting factors in the glycine reconstituted products ranged from 72% to 93%. Glycine reconstitution was superior to deionized water. Conclusion: We documented proteins and coagulation activities were recovered in physiologic quantities in reconstituted spray-dried plasma products. Further optimization of the spray-drying method and reconstitution fluid may result in even better recoveries. Spray drying is a promising technique for preparing human plasma that can be easily stored at room temperature, shipped, and reconstituted. Rapid reconstitution of the microparticles results in a novel plasma product from single donors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)828-833
Number of pages6
JournalTransfusion
Volume52
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Temperature
Glycine
Blood Coagulation Factors
Proteins
Water
Fluid Therapy
Factor VIII
Powders
Immunoglobulin A
Immunoglobulin M
Albumins
Industry
Immunoglobulin G
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Booth, G. S., Lozier, J. N., Nghiem, K., Clibourn, D., Klein, H. G., & Flegel, W. A. (2012). Spray: Single-donor plasma product for room temperature storage. Transfusion, 52(4), 828-833. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1537-2995.2011.03419.x

Spray : Single-donor plasma product for room temperature storage. / Booth, Garrett S.; Lozier, Jay N.; Nghiem, Khanh; Clibourn, Douglas; Klein, Harvey G.; Flegel, Willy A.

In: Transfusion, Vol. 52, No. 4, 04.2012, p. 828-833.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Booth, GS, Lozier, JN, Nghiem, K, Clibourn, D, Klein, HG & Flegel, WA 2012, 'Spray: Single-donor plasma product for room temperature storage', Transfusion, vol. 52, no. 4, pp. 828-833. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1537-2995.2011.03419.x
Booth GS, Lozier JN, Nghiem K, Clibourn D, Klein HG, Flegel WA. Spray: Single-donor plasma product for room temperature storage. Transfusion. 2012 Apr;52(4):828-833. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1537-2995.2011.03419.x
Booth, Garrett S. ; Lozier, Jay N. ; Nghiem, Khanh ; Clibourn, Douglas ; Klein, Harvey G. ; Flegel, Willy A. / Spray : Single-donor plasma product for room temperature storage. In: Transfusion. 2012 ; Vol. 52, No. 4. pp. 828-833.
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