Spouse behavior and coronary heart disease in men: Prospective results from the framingham heart study: I. Concordance of risk factors and the relationship of psychosocial status to coronary incidence

Suzanne G. Haynes, Elaine D. Eaker, Manning Feinleib

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Haynes, S. G., E. D. Eaker (Epidemiology Branch, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD 20205) and M. Feinlelb. Spouse behavior and coronary heart disease in men: Prospective results from the Framlngham Heart Study. I. Concordance of risk factors and the relationship of psychoso-clal status to coronary incidence. Am J Epidemiol 1983; 118: 1-22.The relationship of social status and behavior type to the Incidence of coronary heart disease was examined among husbands and wives In the Framing-ham Heart Study. Between 1965 and 1967, 269 spouse pairs, in which the husbands were 45-64 years of age, were administered an extensive psycho-social questionnaire. These pairs were followed over a 10-year period for the development of heart disease. Men married to women with 13 or more years of education were 2.6 times more likely to develop coronary disease than men married to women with a grammar school education (95% Cl = 1.0-6.9). Incidence rates among husbands married to women employed outside the home were similar to rates among men married to housewives (15.1 vs. 16.1%, respectively). However, men married to women employed In white-collar jobs were over three times more likely to develop heart disease than those married to clerical workers, blue-collar workers, or to housewives (RR = 4.0, 5.4, and 2.9, respectively; p<0.004). The Increased risk in husbands married to women educated beyond the high school level was observed only among men married to women employed outside the home. These effects were apparent regardless of the husband's social status or standard coronary risk factors. Further exploration of these associations revealed that higher-educated working wives whose husbands developed coronary heart disease were significantly more likely to have had a nonsupportive boss and fewer job promotions than wives of noncases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-22
Number of pages22
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume118
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jul 1983
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Spouses
Coronary Disease
Incidence
Heart Diseases
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (U.S.)
Education
Epidemiology

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Cholesterol
  • Marriage
  • Smoking
  • Socioeconomic factors
  • Stress, psychological

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

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title = "Spouse behavior and coronary heart disease in men: Prospective results from the framingham heart study: I. Concordance of risk factors and the relationship of psychosocial status to coronary incidence",
abstract = "Haynes, S. G., E. D. Eaker (Epidemiology Branch, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD 20205) and M. Feinlelb. Spouse behavior and coronary heart disease in men: Prospective results from the Framlngham Heart Study. I. Concordance of risk factors and the relationship of psychoso-clal status to coronary incidence. Am J Epidemiol 1983; 118: 1-22.The relationship of social status and behavior type to the Incidence of coronary heart disease was examined among husbands and wives In the Framing-ham Heart Study. Between 1965 and 1967, 269 spouse pairs, in which the husbands were 45-64 years of age, were administered an extensive psycho-social questionnaire. These pairs were followed over a 10-year period for the development of heart disease. Men married to women with 13 or more years of education were 2.6 times more likely to develop coronary disease than men married to women with a grammar school education (95{\%} Cl = 1.0-6.9). Incidence rates among husbands married to women employed outside the home were similar to rates among men married to housewives (15.1 vs. 16.1{\%}, respectively). However, men married to women employed In white-collar jobs were over three times more likely to develop heart disease than those married to clerical workers, blue-collar workers, or to housewives (RR = 4.0, 5.4, and 2.9, respectively; p<0.004). The Increased risk in husbands married to women educated beyond the high school level was observed only among men married to women employed outside the home. These effects were apparent regardless of the husband's social status or standard coronary risk factors. Further exploration of these associations revealed that higher-educated working wives whose husbands developed coronary heart disease were significantly more likely to have had a nonsupportive boss and fewer job promotions than wives of noncases.",
keywords = "Blood pressure, Cardiovascular diseases, Cholesterol, Marriage, Smoking, Socioeconomic factors, Stress, psychological",
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AB - Haynes, S. G., E. D. Eaker (Epidemiology Branch, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD 20205) and M. Feinlelb. Spouse behavior and coronary heart disease in men: Prospective results from the Framlngham Heart Study. I. Concordance of risk factors and the relationship of psychoso-clal status to coronary incidence. Am J Epidemiol 1983; 118: 1-22.The relationship of social status and behavior type to the Incidence of coronary heart disease was examined among husbands and wives In the Framing-ham Heart Study. Between 1965 and 1967, 269 spouse pairs, in which the husbands were 45-64 years of age, were administered an extensive psycho-social questionnaire. These pairs were followed over a 10-year period for the development of heart disease. Men married to women with 13 or more years of education were 2.6 times more likely to develop coronary disease than men married to women with a grammar school education (95% Cl = 1.0-6.9). Incidence rates among husbands married to women employed outside the home were similar to rates among men married to housewives (15.1 vs. 16.1%, respectively). However, men married to women employed In white-collar jobs were over three times more likely to develop heart disease than those married to clerical workers, blue-collar workers, or to housewives (RR = 4.0, 5.4, and 2.9, respectively; p<0.004). The Increased risk in husbands married to women educated beyond the high school level was observed only among men married to women employed outside the home. These effects were apparent regardless of the husband's social status or standard coronary risk factors. Further exploration of these associations revealed that higher-educated working wives whose husbands developed coronary heart disease were significantly more likely to have had a nonsupportive boss and fewer job promotions than wives of noncases.

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