Spontaneous histamine release after exposure to hyperosmolar solutions

James R. Banks, Anne Kagey-Sobotka, Lawrence M. Lichtenstein, Peyton A. Eggleston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Since basophils from certain allergic individuals release histamine spontaneously in aqueous or deuteriumoxide-containing buffers, we examined spontaneous release after a brief exposure to hyperosmolar buffers. With leukocytes from 71 normal and allergic volunteers, it was found that 15-minute suspension in 770 mosm/kg Ca++-free buffers caused the cells to release 3% to 83% of cellular histamine (mean 29 ± 3) when the cells were resuspended in isosmolar buffers containing Ca++. The cells from individuals with a history of food allergy were significantly more easily activated when the cells were compared to cells of normal volunteers (p <0.005), but cells from other allergic volunteers were more readily activated as well. Activation was maximal at 770 Mosm/kg and occurred in the absence of Ca++, whereas subsequent histamine release was partially Ca++ dependent. Activation could be observed as early as 30 seconds and was maximal at 15 minutes; histamine release from activated cells was almost as rapid. We conclude that the basophils from certain allergic individuals demonstrate unusual "releasability" and that this responsiveness to osmotic activation could play a role in reactions to hyperosmolar radiocontrast media.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-57
Number of pages7
JournalThe Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume78
Issue number1 PART 1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1986

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Histamine Release
Buffers
Basophils
Healthy Volunteers
Food Hypersensitivity
Histamine
Contrast Media
Volunteers
Suspensions
Leukocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Spontaneous histamine release after exposure to hyperosmolar solutions. / Banks, James R.; Kagey-Sobotka, Anne; Lichtenstein, Lawrence M.; Eggleston, Peyton A.

In: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 78, No. 1 PART 1, 1986, p. 51-57.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Banks, JR, Kagey-Sobotka, A, Lichtenstein, LM & Eggleston, PA 1986, 'Spontaneous histamine release after exposure to hyperosmolar solutions', The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 78, no. 1 PART 1, pp. 51-57. https://doi.org/10.1016/0091-6749(86)90114-4
Banks, James R. ; Kagey-Sobotka, Anne ; Lichtenstein, Lawrence M. ; Eggleston, Peyton A. / Spontaneous histamine release after exposure to hyperosmolar solutions. In: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 1986 ; Vol. 78, No. 1 PART 1. pp. 51-57.
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