Spontaneous asymmetric circling behavior in hemi-parkinsonism; a human equivalent of the lesioned-circling rodent behavior

H. S. Bracha, C. Shults, S. D. Glick, J. E. Kleinman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

When induced experimentally in rodents, hemispheric assymetry in basal ganglia dopamine results in spontaneous asymmetric circling toward the hemisphere with the lower level of dopamine. A similar asymmetry has long been thought to exist in the brains of hemi-Parkinsonian patients. Using an electronic turn counter, we demonstrated that, like unilaterally lesioned rats, and without being aware of it, five ambulating outpatients with hemi-Parkinson's disease exhibit spontaneous rotation toward the hemisphere containing less striatal dopaminergic activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1127-1130
Number of pages4
JournalLife Sciences
Volume40
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 16 1987
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

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