Spleen-preserving pancreatectomy for cystic pancreatic neoplasms

Jeffrey R. Lukish, James H. Rothstein, Mark Petruzziello, Rex Kiteley, John Denobile, Peter Soballe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are an uncommon entity comprising fewer than 1 per cent of all pancreatic neoplasms. The guidelines for management of these tumors, specifically, the extent of resection, are unclear. Formerly, a distal pancreatectomy including the spleen was performed for tumors in the tail of the pancreas. The importance of preserving the spleen has been well documented; however, there are few reports of spleen-preserving pancreatectomy for cystic neoplasms of the distal pancreas. We report two patients who underwent spleen-preserving pancreapancreatectomy for mucinous cystic neoplasms in the tail of the pancreas. Both patients were female, ages 39 and 65 years. Preoperative preparation included administration of vaccinations and subcutaneous somatostatin. Operative technique emphasized division of the splenic artery and vein beyond the tip of the distal pancreas without mobilization of the spleen. The pancreas was transected with a vascular stapler. Fibrin glue was applied to the margin of the pancreas. The operative blood loss, duration of operation, and postoperative hospital stay were 150 and 250 mL, 150 and 180 minutes, and 7 and 9 days, respectively. The pathology revealed both lesions to be mucinous cystic neoplasms. The patients recovered and at 6-month follow-up were without complaints and in good health. Spleen-preserving pancreatectomy is rapid and associated with minimal morbidity. This procedure should be considered in the surgical management of cystic neoplasms in the tail of the pancreas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)596-599
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume65
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1999
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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