Spectrum of dizziness visits to US emergency departments

Cross-sectional analysis from a nationally representative sample

David E Newman-Toker, Yu-Hsiang Hsieh, Carlos A. Camargo, Andrea J. Pelletier, Gregary T. Butchy, Jonathan A. Edlow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To describe the spectrum of visits to US emergency departments (EDs) for acute dizziness and determine whether ED patients with dizziness are diagnosed as having a range of benign and dangerous medical disorders, rather than predominantly vestibular ones. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study of ED visits from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) used a weighted sample of US ED visits (1993-2005) to measure patient and hospital demographics, ED diagnoses, and resource use in cases vs controls without dizziness. Dizziness in patients 16 years or older was defined as an NHAMCS reason-for-visit code of dizziness/vertigo (1225.0) or a final International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis of dizziness/vertigo (780.4) or of a vestibular disorder (386.x). RESULTS: A total of 9472 dizziness cases (3.3% of visits) were sampled over 13 years (weighted 33.6 million). Top diagnostic groups were otologic/vestibular (32.9%), cardiovascular (21.1%), respiratory (11.5%), neurologic (11.2%, including 4% cerebrovascular), metabolic (11.0%), injury/poisoning (10.6%), psychiatric (7.2%), digestive (7.0%), genitourinary (5.1%), and infectious (2.9%). Nearly half of the cases (49.2%) were given a medical diagnosis, and 22.1% were given only a symptom diagnosis. Pre-defined dangerous disorders were diagnosed in 15%, especially among those older than 50 years (20.9% vs 9.3%; P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)765-775
Number of pages11
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume83
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

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Dizziness
Hospital Emergency Service
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health Care Surveys
Vertigo
International Classification of Diseases
Poisoning
Nervous System
Psychiatry
Demography
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Spectrum of dizziness visits to US emergency departments : Cross-sectional analysis from a nationally representative sample. / Newman-Toker, David E; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Camargo, Carlos A.; Pelletier, Andrea J.; Butchy, Gregary T.; Edlow, Jonathan A.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 83, No. 7, 2008, p. 765-775.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Newman-Toker, David E ; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang ; Camargo, Carlos A. ; Pelletier, Andrea J. ; Butchy, Gregary T. ; Edlow, Jonathan A. / Spectrum of dizziness visits to US emergency departments : Cross-sectional analysis from a nationally representative sample. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2008 ; Vol. 83, No. 7. pp. 765-775.
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