Spectral/photon-counting computed tomography

Jochen Cammin, Jan S. Iwanczyk, Katsuyuki Taguchi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

For over 100 years, x-rays have played a crucial role in imaging the internal structure of objects nondestructively. e usefulness of x-rays for medical purposes was recognized as soon as Wilhelm C. Röntgen took the famous transmission image of his wife’s hand in 1895 (Kevles 1996). For the next 7 decades, the same simple two-dimensional projection method, still known from dental x-rays, for example, remained the state of the art for medical imaging. It was not until the 1970s that x-ray imaging fundamentally changed with the invention of computed tomography (CT) (Ambrose 1973; Hounseld 1973) and the necessary reconstruction algorithms (Cormack 1963, 1964). Hounseld’s CT scanner allowed visualization of two-dimensional slices of the human body rather than projection images where all the organs are superimposed and overlapped. e technology was rened quickly over the next 20 years, decreasing scan times and radiation dose and increasing the spatial resolution and the eldof-view size. Medical imaging experienced another boost in the 1990s with the advent of multislice CT scanners. ey allowed acquisition of true three-dimensional data sets and reconstruction of volumetric images in a single scan. Even whole-body scans became possible with clinically acceptable scan times and radiation dose levels. Multislice CT (or MDCT for multidetector CT) is now the state-of-the-art technology for fast, high-resolution, and cost-eective imaging of the human body with a wide range of clinical applications. With gantry rotation times of <0.3 s and detectors with up to 320 rows, it is possible to scan entire organs like the heart in <1 s.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEmerging Imaging Technologies in Medicine
PublisherCRC Press
Pages23-39
Number of pages17
ISBN (Electronic)9781439880425
ISBN (Print)9781439880418
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

Photons
Tomography
Multidetector Computed Tomography
counting
tomography
X-Rays
X rays
Medical imaging
photons
Diagnostic Imaging
Human Body
Imaging techniques
Dosimetry
human body
Multidetector computed tomography
organs
scanners
X-Ray Computed Tomography Scanners
Radiation
Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Engineering(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Cammin, J., Iwanczyk, J. S., & Taguchi, K. (2012). Spectral/photon-counting computed tomography. In Emerging Imaging Technologies in Medicine (pp. 23-39). CRC Press. https://doi.org/10.1201/b13680

Spectral/photon-counting computed tomography. / Cammin, Jochen; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Taguchi, Katsuyuki.

Emerging Imaging Technologies in Medicine. CRC Press, 2012. p. 23-39.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Cammin, J, Iwanczyk, JS & Taguchi, K 2012, Spectral/photon-counting computed tomography. in Emerging Imaging Technologies in Medicine. CRC Press, pp. 23-39. https://doi.org/10.1201/b13680
Cammin J, Iwanczyk JS, Taguchi K. Spectral/photon-counting computed tomography. In Emerging Imaging Technologies in Medicine. CRC Press. 2012. p. 23-39 https://doi.org/10.1201/b13680
Cammin, Jochen ; Iwanczyk, Jan S. ; Taguchi, Katsuyuki. / Spectral/photon-counting computed tomography. Emerging Imaging Technologies in Medicine. CRC Press, 2012. pp. 23-39
@inbook{38bd995b6ba447c2b248dbe02edbb959,
title = "Spectral/photon-counting computed tomography",
abstract = "For over 100 years, x-rays have played a crucial role in imaging the internal structure of objects nondestructively. e usefulness of x-rays for medical purposes was recognized as soon as Wilhelm C. R{\"o}ntgen took the famous transmission image of his wife’s hand in 1895 (Kevles 1996). For the next 7 decades, the same simple two-dimensional projection method, still known from dental x-rays, for example, remained the state of the art for medical imaging. It was not until the 1970s that x-ray imaging fundamentally changed with the invention of computed tomography (CT) (Ambrose 1973; Hounseld 1973) and the necessary reconstruction algorithms (Cormack 1963, 1964). Hounseld’s CT scanner allowed visualization of two-dimensional slices of the human body rather than projection images where all the organs are superimposed and overlapped. e technology was rened quickly over the next 20 years, decreasing scan times and radiation dose and increasing the spatial resolution and the eldof-view size. Medical imaging experienced another boost in the 1990s with the advent of multislice CT scanners. ey allowed acquisition of true three-dimensional data sets and reconstruction of volumetric images in a single scan. Even whole-body scans became possible with clinically acceptable scan times and radiation dose levels. Multislice CT (or MDCT for multidetector CT) is now the state-of-the-art technology for fast, high-resolution, and cost-eective imaging of the human body with a wide range of clinical applications. With gantry rotation times of <0.3 s and detectors with up to 320 rows, it is possible to scan entire organs like the heart in <1 s.",
author = "Jochen Cammin and Iwanczyk, {Jan S.} and Katsuyuki Taguchi",
year = "2012",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1201/b13680",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9781439880418",
pages = "23--39",
booktitle = "Emerging Imaging Technologies in Medicine",
publisher = "CRC Press",
address = "United States",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Spectral/photon-counting computed tomography

AU - Cammin, Jochen

AU - Iwanczyk, Jan S.

AU - Taguchi, Katsuyuki

PY - 2012/1/1

Y1 - 2012/1/1

N2 - For over 100 years, x-rays have played a crucial role in imaging the internal structure of objects nondestructively. e usefulness of x-rays for medical purposes was recognized as soon as Wilhelm C. Röntgen took the famous transmission image of his wife’s hand in 1895 (Kevles 1996). For the next 7 decades, the same simple two-dimensional projection method, still known from dental x-rays, for example, remained the state of the art for medical imaging. It was not until the 1970s that x-ray imaging fundamentally changed with the invention of computed tomography (CT) (Ambrose 1973; Hounseld 1973) and the necessary reconstruction algorithms (Cormack 1963, 1964). Hounseld’s CT scanner allowed visualization of two-dimensional slices of the human body rather than projection images where all the organs are superimposed and overlapped. e technology was rened quickly over the next 20 years, decreasing scan times and radiation dose and increasing the spatial resolution and the eldof-view size. Medical imaging experienced another boost in the 1990s with the advent of multislice CT scanners. ey allowed acquisition of true three-dimensional data sets and reconstruction of volumetric images in a single scan. Even whole-body scans became possible with clinically acceptable scan times and radiation dose levels. Multislice CT (or MDCT for multidetector CT) is now the state-of-the-art technology for fast, high-resolution, and cost-eective imaging of the human body with a wide range of clinical applications. With gantry rotation times of <0.3 s and detectors with up to 320 rows, it is possible to scan entire organs like the heart in <1 s.

AB - For over 100 years, x-rays have played a crucial role in imaging the internal structure of objects nondestructively. e usefulness of x-rays for medical purposes was recognized as soon as Wilhelm C. Röntgen took the famous transmission image of his wife’s hand in 1895 (Kevles 1996). For the next 7 decades, the same simple two-dimensional projection method, still known from dental x-rays, for example, remained the state of the art for medical imaging. It was not until the 1970s that x-ray imaging fundamentally changed with the invention of computed tomography (CT) (Ambrose 1973; Hounseld 1973) and the necessary reconstruction algorithms (Cormack 1963, 1964). Hounseld’s CT scanner allowed visualization of two-dimensional slices of the human body rather than projection images where all the organs are superimposed and overlapped. e technology was rened quickly over the next 20 years, decreasing scan times and radiation dose and increasing the spatial resolution and the eldof-view size. Medical imaging experienced another boost in the 1990s with the advent of multislice CT scanners. ey allowed acquisition of true three-dimensional data sets and reconstruction of volumetric images in a single scan. Even whole-body scans became possible with clinically acceptable scan times and radiation dose levels. Multislice CT (or MDCT for multidetector CT) is now the state-of-the-art technology for fast, high-resolution, and cost-eective imaging of the human body with a wide range of clinical applications. With gantry rotation times of <0.3 s and detectors with up to 320 rows, it is possible to scan entire organs like the heart in <1 s.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84905563617&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84905563617&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1201/b13680

DO - 10.1201/b13680

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:84905563617

SN - 9781439880418

SP - 23

EP - 39

BT - Emerging Imaging Technologies in Medicine

PB - CRC Press

ER -