Specific motor abilities associated with speech fluency in Down's syndrome

D. A. DEVENNY, W. SILVERMAN, H. BALGLEY, M. J. WALL, J. J. SIDTIS

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

ABSTRACT. Eight adult male stutterers with Down's syndrome (DS) were compared with a matched group of fluent speakers with DS on verbal and manual motor production tasks at two levels of complexity. The simpler tasks involved diadochokinetic rate (syllable repetition) and finger tapping; the more complex tasks involved the imitation of sentences and placing pegs in the grooved pegboard. On both verbal and manual tasks, stutterers were faster on the simpler but slower on the more complex tasks than were the fluent speakers. The findings suggest that stutterers with DS have a different motor organization than fluent speakers with DS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)437-443
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Intellectual Disability Research
Volume34
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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