Special problems in cavernous malformations: Migraine, pregnancy, hormonal replacement, anticoagulation, NSAIDs, stress, and altitude elevation changes

Richard Leigh, Robert J. Wityk

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Introduction Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) of the nervous system are relatively rare and can be symptomatic or incidentally discovered. Factors leading to their discovery are varied and not always causally associated. While a seizure may lead to discovery of a symptomatic CCM, a headache may lead to an incidental discovery of an asymptomatic CCM. Cerebrovascular neurologists and neurosurgeons are often asked about the safety and relationship of various medical issues with the CCM. The problem of epilepsy is covered in another chapter. In this chapter, we focus on some common questions that have arisen during consultation, such as the relationship to migraine, effects of pregnancy, and particularly the safety of use of antithrombotic agents in CCM patients. With the widespread use of brain MRI and the more frequent use of hemosiderin-sensitive sequences, the discovery of asymptomatic CCMs will probably increase. This book contains current information concerning the pathology, diagnosis and natural history and treatment of CCMs, but a number of medical and neurological issues arise in patients with CCMs that have not been as well studied. These issues will eventually present to the practitioner, and we have reviewed the literature to give the best guidance on management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCavernous Malformations of the Nervous System
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages185-190
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9781139003636
ISBN (Print)9780521764278
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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