Spatial analysis of food insecurity and obesity by area-level deprivation in children in early years settings in England

Sara E. Benjamin Neelon, Thomas Burgoine, John A. Gallis, Pablo Monsivais

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background we assessed manager perceptions of food security and obesity in young children attending nurseries across England, assessing spatial differences by area-level deprivation. Methods we conducted an adjusted multinomial logistic regression and an adjusted geographically weighted logistic regression examining the odds of a manager perceiving obesity, food insecurity, or both as a problem among children in care measured via a mailed survey. Results 851 (54.3%) managers returned the survey. A nursery being in the highest tertile of area-level deprivation was associated with a 1.89 (95% CI 1.00, 3.57) greater odds of perceiving obesity as a problem, a 3.06 (95% CI 1.94, 4.84) greater odds of perceiving food insecurity as a problem, and a 8.39 (95% CI 4.36, 16.15) greater odds of perceiving both as a problem, compared with the lowest tertile. Conclusions we observed differences in manager perception by area-level deprivation, but the relationship was especially pronounced for food insecurity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalSpatial and Spatio-temporal Epidemiology
Volume23
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2017

Keywords

  • Area-level deprivation
  • Food insecurity
  • Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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