Spatial analyses identify the geographic source of patients at a National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center

Shu Chih Su, Norma F Kanarek, Michael G. Fox, Alla Guseynova, Shirley Crow, Steven Piantadosi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: We examined the geographic distribution of patients to better understand the service area of the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, a designated National Cancer Institute (NCI) comprehensive cancer center located in an urban center. Like most NCI cancer centers, the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center serves a population beyond city limits. Urban cancer centers are expected to serve their immediate neighborhoods and to address disparities in access to specialty care. Our purpose was to learn the extent and nature of the cancer center service area. Experimental Design: Statistical clustering of patient residence in the continental United States was assessed for all patients and by gender, cancer site, and race using SaTScan. Results: Primary clusters detected for all cases and demographically and tumor-defined subpopulations were centered at Baltimore City and consisted of adjacent counties in Delaware, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, New Jersey and New York, and the District of Columbia. Primary clusters varied in size by race, gender, and cancer site. Spatial analysis can provide insights into the populations served by urban cancer centers, assess centers' performance relative to their communities, and aid in developing a cancer center business plan that recognizes strengths, regional utility, and referral patterns. Conclusions: Today, 62 NCI cancer centers serve a quarter of the U.S. population in their immediate communities. From the Baltimore experience, we might project that the population served by these centers is actually more extensive and varies by patient characteristics, cancer site, and probably cancer center services offered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1065-1072
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Cancer Research
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2010

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Spatial Analysis
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
Neoplasms
Baltimore
Population
Urban Population
Cluster Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

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Spatial analyses identify the geographic source of patients at a National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center. / Su, Shu Chih; Kanarek, Norma F; Fox, Michael G.; Guseynova, Alla; Crow, Shirley; Piantadosi, Steven.

In: Clinical Cancer Research, Vol. 16, No. 3, 01.02.2010, p. 1065-1072.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Su, Shu Chih ; Kanarek, Norma F ; Fox, Michael G. ; Guseynova, Alla ; Crow, Shirley ; Piantadosi, Steven. / Spatial analyses identify the geographic source of patients at a National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center. In: Clinical Cancer Research. 2010 ; Vol. 16, No. 3. pp. 1065-1072.
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