Sources of household air pollution and their association with fine particulate matter in low-income urban homes in India

Jessica L. Elf, Aarti Kinikar, Sandhya Khadse, Vidya Mave, Nishi Suryavanshi, Nikhil Gupte, Vaishali Kulkarni, Sunita Patekar, Priyanka Raichur, Patrick N Breysse, Amita Gupta, Jonathan E Golub

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Household air pollution (HAP) is poorly characterized in low-income urban Indian communities. Materials and methods: A questionnaire assessing sources of HAP and 24 h household concentrations of particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in diameter (PM2.5) were collected in a sample of low-income homes in Pune, India. Results: In 166 homes, the median 24 h average concentration of PM2.5 was 167 μg/m3 (IQR: 106–294). Although kerosene and wood use were highly prevalent (22% and 25% of homes, respectively), primarily as secondary fuel sources, high PM2.5 concentrations were also found in 95 (57%) homes reporting LPG use alone (mean 141 μg/m3; IQR: 92–209). In adjusted linear regression, log PM2.5 concentration was positively associated with wood cooking fuel (GMR 1.5, 95% CI: 1.1–2.0), mosquito coils (GMR 1.5, 95% CI: 1.1–2.1), and winter season (GMR 1.7, 95% CI: 1.4–2.2). Households in the highest quartile of exposure were positively associated with wood cooking fuel (OR 1.3, 95% CI: 1.1–1.5), incense (OR 1.1, 95% CI: 1.0–1.3), mosquito coils (OR 1.3, 95% CI: 1.1–1.6), and winter season (OR 1.2, 95% CI: 1.1–1.4). Discussion: We observed high concentrations of PM2.5 and identified associated determinants in urban Indian homes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 23 2018

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Particulate Matter
Air Pollution
Air pollution
India
Wood
Cooking
Culicidae
Penicillin G Benzathine
Liquefied petroleum gas
Kerosene
Linear regression
Linear Models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Toxicology
  • Pollution
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Sources of household air pollution and their association with fine particulate matter in low-income urban homes in India. / Elf, Jessica L.; Kinikar, Aarti; Khadse, Sandhya; Mave, Vidya; Suryavanshi, Nishi; Gupte, Nikhil; Kulkarni, Vaishali; Patekar, Sunita; Raichur, Priyanka; Breysse, Patrick N; Gupta, Amita; Golub, Jonathan E.

In: Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology, 23.05.2018, p. 1-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Elf, Jessica L.

AU - Kinikar, Aarti

AU - Khadse, Sandhya

AU - Mave, Vidya

AU - Suryavanshi, Nishi

AU - Gupte, Nikhil

AU - Kulkarni, Vaishali

AU - Patekar, Sunita

AU - Raichur, Priyanka

AU - Breysse, Patrick N

AU - Gupta, Amita

AU - Golub, Jonathan E

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