Sources of Health Information Among Select Asian American Immigrant Groups in New York City

Nadia S. Islam, Shilpa Patel, Laura C. Wyatt, Shao Chee Sim, Runi Mukherjee-Ratnam, Kay Chun, Bhairavi Desai, S. Darius Tandon, Chau Trinh-Shevrin, Henry Pollack, Simona C. Kwon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Health information can potentially mitigate adverse health outcomes among ethnic minority populations, but little research has examined how minorities access health information. The aim of this study was to examine variations in the use of health information sources among Asian American (AA) subgroups and to identify differences in characteristics associated with the use of these sources. We analyzed data from a foreign-born community sample of 219 Asian Indians, 216 Bangladeshis, 484 Chinese, and 464 Koreans living in New York City. Results found that use of health information sources varied by AA subgroup. Print media source use, which included newspapers, magazines, and/or journals, was highest among Chinese (84%), Koreans (75%), and Bangladeshis (80%), while radio was most utilized by Chinese (48%) and Koreans (38%). Television utilization was highest among Bangladeshis (74%) and Koreans (64%). Koreans (52%) and Chinese (40%) were most likely to use the Internet to access health information. Radio use was best explained by older age and longer time lived in the United States, while print media were more utilized by older individuals. Results also highlighted differences in native-language versus non-native-language media sources for health information by subgroup. Media sources can be used as a vehicle to disseminate health information among AAs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-216
Number of pages10
JournalHealth Communication
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Asian Americans
health information
immigrant
Health
Group
print media
Radio
radio
Language
Minority Health
Access to Information
Newspapers
Television
language
Internet
magazine
national minority
television
newspaper
utilization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication

Cite this

Islam, N. S., Patel, S., Wyatt, L. C., Sim, S. C., Mukherjee-Ratnam, R., Chun, K., ... Kwon, S. C. (2016). Sources of Health Information Among Select Asian American Immigrant Groups in New York City. Health Communication, 31(2), 207-216. https://doi.org/10.1080/10410236.2014.944332

Sources of Health Information Among Select Asian American Immigrant Groups in New York City. / Islam, Nadia S.; Patel, Shilpa; Wyatt, Laura C.; Sim, Shao Chee; Mukherjee-Ratnam, Runi; Chun, Kay; Desai, Bhairavi; Tandon, S. Darius; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau; Pollack, Henry; Kwon, Simona C.

In: Health Communication, Vol. 31, No. 2, 01.02.2016, p. 207-216.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Islam, NS, Patel, S, Wyatt, LC, Sim, SC, Mukherjee-Ratnam, R, Chun, K, Desai, B, Tandon, SD, Trinh-Shevrin, C, Pollack, H & Kwon, SC 2016, 'Sources of Health Information Among Select Asian American Immigrant Groups in New York City', Health Communication, vol. 31, no. 2, pp. 207-216. https://doi.org/10.1080/10410236.2014.944332
Islam, Nadia S. ; Patel, Shilpa ; Wyatt, Laura C. ; Sim, Shao Chee ; Mukherjee-Ratnam, Runi ; Chun, Kay ; Desai, Bhairavi ; Tandon, S. Darius ; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau ; Pollack, Henry ; Kwon, Simona C. / Sources of Health Information Among Select Asian American Immigrant Groups in New York City. In: Health Communication. 2016 ; Vol. 31, No. 2. pp. 207-216.
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