Source parameters of the left ventricle related to the physiological characteristics of the cardiac muscle

R. Beyar, S. Sideman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

An attempt is made here to correlate the physiological muscle parameters with the dynamic source parameters of the left ventricle (LV), i.e. the source (isovolumic) pressure P(o) and the source (internal) resistance, R(s). The internal resistance is described here as a time-dependent parameter, corresponding to the pressure drop (from the theoretical instantaneous isovolumic pressure) associated with the instantaneous ejection flow rate. The source pressure, which relates to the muscle stress and the ventricular volume, is represented by the time-varying elastance concept and a spheroidal model relating the average wall stress to LV pressure. Linear and exponential force-velocity relationships (FVR), expressed in stress-strain rate terms, are compared. Two possible characteristics of the dynamic FVR in the partially active state, based on either a parallel or a fanlike shift of the stress-strain rate curve, are studied by utilizing simple analytical models as well as a computer simulation model. Comparing the calculated results with experimental data indicates that the dynamic FVR shift occurs in a fanlike pattern in which the maximum strain rate remains constant throughout the cycle. This pattern of the FVR shift is consistent with experimental data that show that the internal resistance is linearly related to the instantaneous isovolumic pressure. The analysis also indicates that the difference between the hyperbolic and linear FVR is rather minor, and in spite of some effects on the ejection pattern and the value of R(s), the functional shape has no effect on the global LV characteristics, such as the ejection fraction and stroke volume.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1185-1194
Number of pages10
JournalBiophysical Journal
Volume49
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics

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