Sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics associated with blood donation in the United States: a population-based study

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Contemporary population-based data on characteristics associated with blood donation in the United States (U.S.) are limited. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis was performed among 28,739 persons aged 18 years and older who participated in the 2016 National Health Interview Survey, a household survey of the noninstitutionalized U.S. civilian population. Analyses were weighted and accounted for the complex survey design. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) were estimated by multivariable log-binomial regression. RESULTS: The percentage of individuals reporting a past-year history of blood donation was 5.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.3%-6.1%) and was highest in the youngest age group (18-24 years, 8.4%). A past-year history of blood donation was more common in males compared to females (6.3% vs. 5.1%; aPR, 1.12 [95% CI, 0.99-1.27]) and those born in the U.S. compared to individuals born outside the U.S. (6.4% vs. 2.4%; aPR, 1.92 [95% CI, 1.49-2.47]). The percentage of individuals with a past-year history of blood donation was significantly lower in blacks (3.9%; aPR, 0.60 [95% CI, 0.47-0.75]) and Hispanics (3.0%; aPR, 0.63 [95% CI, 0.48-0.83]) in comparison to whites (6.9%). Being a college graduate, being employed, being physically active, and never being a cigarette smoker were factors positively associated with blood donation. The percentage of individuals with a past-year history of blood donation varied by geographic census region, with prevalence being higher in the Midwest (7.3%) and South (6.0%) compared to the Northeast (4.7%) and West (4.4%). CONCLUSION: Continued differences in the blood donor population with reference to the U.S. population underscore the need to understand barriers or deterrents to blood donation. Evidence-based donor recruitment and related policies remain imperative to ensure that there is a sustainable blood supply.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalTransfusion
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Blood Donors
Population
Confidence Intervals
Censuses
Health Surveys
Hispanic Americans
Tobacco Products
Age Groups
Cross-Sectional Studies
Tissue Donors
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Hematology

Cite this

@article{5abe511cafc64fd9948b433cac4765bf,
title = "Sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics associated with blood donation in the United States: a population-based study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Contemporary population-based data on characteristics associated with blood donation in the United States (U.S.) are limited. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis was performed among 28,739 persons aged 18 years and older who participated in the 2016 National Health Interview Survey, a household survey of the noninstitutionalized U.S. civilian population. Analyses were weighted and accounted for the complex survey design. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) were estimated by multivariable log-binomial regression. RESULTS: The percentage of individuals reporting a past-year history of blood donation was 5.7{\%} (95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 5.3{\%}-6.1{\%}) and was highest in the youngest age group (18-24 years, 8.4{\%}). A past-year history of blood donation was more common in males compared to females (6.3{\%} vs. 5.1{\%}; aPR, 1.12 [95{\%} CI, 0.99-1.27]) and those born in the U.S. compared to individuals born outside the U.S. (6.4{\%} vs. 2.4{\%}; aPR, 1.92 [95{\%} CI, 1.49-2.47]). The percentage of individuals with a past-year history of blood donation was significantly lower in blacks (3.9{\%}; aPR, 0.60 [95{\%} CI, 0.47-0.75]) and Hispanics (3.0{\%}; aPR, 0.63 [95{\%} CI, 0.48-0.83]) in comparison to whites (6.9{\%}). Being a college graduate, being employed, being physically active, and never being a cigarette smoker were factors positively associated with blood donation. The percentage of individuals with a past-year history of blood donation varied by geographic census region, with prevalence being higher in the Midwest (7.3{\%}) and South (6.0{\%}) compared to the Northeast (4.7{\%}) and West (4.4{\%}). CONCLUSION: Continued differences in the blood donor population with reference to the U.S. population underscore the need to understand barriers or deterrents to blood donation. Evidence-based donor recruitment and related policies remain imperative to ensure that there is a sustainable blood supply.",
author = "Patel, {Eshan U.} and Bloch, {Evan M.} and Grabowski, {Mary K.} and Ruchika Goel and Lokhandwala, {Parvez M.} and Brunker, {Patricia A.R.} and White, {Jodie L.} and Beth Shaz and Ness, {Paul M.} and Tobian, {Aaron A.R.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/trf.15415",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Transfusion",
issn = "0041-1132",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics associated with blood donation in the United States

T2 - a population-based study

AU - Patel, Eshan U.

AU - Bloch, Evan M.

AU - Grabowski, Mary K.

AU - Goel, Ruchika

AU - Lokhandwala, Parvez M.

AU - Brunker, Patricia A.R.

AU - White, Jodie L.

AU - Shaz, Beth

AU - Ness, Paul M.

AU - Tobian, Aaron A.R.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Contemporary population-based data on characteristics associated with blood donation in the United States (U.S.) are limited. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis was performed among 28,739 persons aged 18 years and older who participated in the 2016 National Health Interview Survey, a household survey of the noninstitutionalized U.S. civilian population. Analyses were weighted and accounted for the complex survey design. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) were estimated by multivariable log-binomial regression. RESULTS: The percentage of individuals reporting a past-year history of blood donation was 5.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.3%-6.1%) and was highest in the youngest age group (18-24 years, 8.4%). A past-year history of blood donation was more common in males compared to females (6.3% vs. 5.1%; aPR, 1.12 [95% CI, 0.99-1.27]) and those born in the U.S. compared to individuals born outside the U.S. (6.4% vs. 2.4%; aPR, 1.92 [95% CI, 1.49-2.47]). The percentage of individuals with a past-year history of blood donation was significantly lower in blacks (3.9%; aPR, 0.60 [95% CI, 0.47-0.75]) and Hispanics (3.0%; aPR, 0.63 [95% CI, 0.48-0.83]) in comparison to whites (6.9%). Being a college graduate, being employed, being physically active, and never being a cigarette smoker were factors positively associated with blood donation. The percentage of individuals with a past-year history of blood donation varied by geographic census region, with prevalence being higher in the Midwest (7.3%) and South (6.0%) compared to the Northeast (4.7%) and West (4.4%). CONCLUSION: Continued differences in the blood donor population with reference to the U.S. population underscore the need to understand barriers or deterrents to blood donation. Evidence-based donor recruitment and related policies remain imperative to ensure that there is a sustainable blood supply.

AB - BACKGROUND: Contemporary population-based data on characteristics associated with blood donation in the United States (U.S.) are limited. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis was performed among 28,739 persons aged 18 years and older who participated in the 2016 National Health Interview Survey, a household survey of the noninstitutionalized U.S. civilian population. Analyses were weighted and accounted for the complex survey design. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) were estimated by multivariable log-binomial regression. RESULTS: The percentage of individuals reporting a past-year history of blood donation was 5.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.3%-6.1%) and was highest in the youngest age group (18-24 years, 8.4%). A past-year history of blood donation was more common in males compared to females (6.3% vs. 5.1%; aPR, 1.12 [95% CI, 0.99-1.27]) and those born in the U.S. compared to individuals born outside the U.S. (6.4% vs. 2.4%; aPR, 1.92 [95% CI, 1.49-2.47]). The percentage of individuals with a past-year history of blood donation was significantly lower in blacks (3.9%; aPR, 0.60 [95% CI, 0.47-0.75]) and Hispanics (3.0%; aPR, 0.63 [95% CI, 0.48-0.83]) in comparison to whites (6.9%). Being a college graduate, being employed, being physically active, and never being a cigarette smoker were factors positively associated with blood donation. The percentage of individuals with a past-year history of blood donation varied by geographic census region, with prevalence being higher in the Midwest (7.3%) and South (6.0%) compared to the Northeast (4.7%) and West (4.4%). CONCLUSION: Continued differences in the blood donor population with reference to the U.S. population underscore the need to understand barriers or deterrents to blood donation. Evidence-based donor recruitment and related policies remain imperative to ensure that there is a sustainable blood supply.

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DO - 10.1111/trf.15415

M3 - Article

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JF - Transfusion

SN - 0041-1132

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