Sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics associated with blood donation in the United States: a population-based study

Eshan U. Patel, Evan M. Bloch, Mary K. Grabowski, Ruchika Goel, Parvez M. Lokhandwala, Patricia A.R. Brunker, Jodie L. White, Beth Shaz, Paul M. Ness, Aaron A.R. Tobian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Contemporary population-based data on characteristics associated with blood donation in the United States (U.S.) are limited. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis was performed among 28,739 persons aged 18 years and older who participated in the 2016 National Health Interview Survey, a household survey of the noninstitutionalized U.S. civilian population. Analyses were weighted and accounted for the complex survey design. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) were estimated by multivariable log-binomial regression. RESULTS: The percentage of individuals reporting a past-year history of blood donation was 5.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.3%-6.1%) and was highest in the youngest age group (18-24 years, 8.4%). A past-year history of blood donation was more common in males compared to females (6.3% vs. 5.1%; aPR, 1.12 [95% CI, 0.99-1.27]) and those born in the U.S. compared to individuals born outside the U.S. (6.4% vs. 2.4%; aPR, 1.92 [95% CI, 1.49-2.47]). The percentage of individuals with a past-year history of blood donation was significantly lower in blacks (3.9%; aPR, 0.60 [95% CI, 0.47-0.75]) and Hispanics (3.0%; aPR, 0.63 [95% CI, 0.48-0.83]) in comparison to whites (6.9%). Being a college graduate, being employed, being physically active, and never being a cigarette smoker were factors positively associated with blood donation. The percentage of individuals with a past-year history of blood donation varied by geographic census region, with prevalence being higher in the Midwest (7.3%) and South (6.0%) compared to the Northeast (4.7%) and West (4.4%). CONCLUSION: Continued differences in the blood donor population with reference to the U.S. population underscore the need to understand barriers or deterrents to blood donation. Evidence-based donor recruitment and related policies remain imperative to ensure that there is a sustainable blood supply.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2899-2907
Number of pages9
JournalTransfusion
Volume59
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Hematology

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