Sociodemographic and access-related correlates of health-care utilization among African American injection drug users: The BESURE study

Allysha C. Maragh-Bass, Christine Powell, Ju Nyeong Park, Colin Flynn, Danielle German

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Persons who inject drugs (PWID) may have less access to, and utilization of, health-care services, and African American PWID may be less likely than other racial groups to utilize health care in the United States. The present study evaluated the prevalence of health-care utilization (HCU) among a cohort of African American PWID in Baltimore. Data were from the 2012 Baltimore National HIV Behavioral Surveillance study. Participants were adult PWID and recruited using respondent-driven sampling (RDS). They completed a comprehensive sociobehavioral survey and voluntary HIV test with trained study interviewers. Analyses included descriptive and bivariate statistics to examine the prevalence of HCU, defined as seeing a health-care provider in the past year. Poisson regression assessed correlates of HCU. Participants were 61% male; 23% self-reported HIV seropositivity. Nearly 90% reported unemployment and/or disability; HCU prevalence was 85%. Significant negative correlates of HCU included age and higher injection frequency; positive correlates included previous incarceration and moderate financial stability. Interaction analyses showed unemployed publicly insured individuals had 30% higher HCU than unemployed and uninsured individuals (χ2 = 2.52; p 

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-19
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jul 12 2016

Fingerprint

Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Drug Users
African Americans
utilization
health care
drug
Injections
Baltimore
Pharmaceutical Preparations
human being
HIV
HIV Seropositivity
Health Services Accessibility
Unemployment
Health Personnel
Health Services
American
health care services
Cross-Sectional Studies
Interviews

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • health disparities
  • health-care utilization
  • HIV/AIDS
  • injection drug use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

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title = "Sociodemographic and access-related correlates of health-care utilization among African American injection drug users: The BESURE study",
abstract = "Persons who inject drugs (PWID) may have less access to, and utilization of, health-care services, and African American PWID may be less likely than other racial groups to utilize health care in the United States. The present study evaluated the prevalence of health-care utilization (HCU) among a cohort of African American PWID in Baltimore. Data were from the 2012 Baltimore National HIV Behavioral Surveillance study. Participants were adult PWID and recruited using respondent-driven sampling (RDS). They completed a comprehensive sociobehavioral survey and voluntary HIV test with trained study interviewers. Analyses included descriptive and bivariate statistics to examine the prevalence of HCU, defined as seeing a health-care provider in the past year. Poisson regression assessed correlates of HCU. Participants were 61{\%} male; 23{\%} self-reported HIV seropositivity. Nearly 90{\%} reported unemployment and/or disability; HCU prevalence was 85{\%}. Significant negative correlates of HCU included age and higher injection frequency; positive correlates included previous incarceration and moderate financial stability. Interaction analyses showed unemployed publicly insured individuals had 30{\%} higher HCU than unemployed and uninsured individuals (χ2 = 2.52; p ",
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N2 - Persons who inject drugs (PWID) may have less access to, and utilization of, health-care services, and African American PWID may be less likely than other racial groups to utilize health care in the United States. The present study evaluated the prevalence of health-care utilization (HCU) among a cohort of African American PWID in Baltimore. Data were from the 2012 Baltimore National HIV Behavioral Surveillance study. Participants were adult PWID and recruited using respondent-driven sampling (RDS). They completed a comprehensive sociobehavioral survey and voluntary HIV test with trained study interviewers. Analyses included descriptive and bivariate statistics to examine the prevalence of HCU, defined as seeing a health-care provider in the past year. Poisson regression assessed correlates of HCU. Participants were 61% male; 23% self-reported HIV seropositivity. Nearly 90% reported unemployment and/or disability; HCU prevalence was 85%. Significant negative correlates of HCU included age and higher injection frequency; positive correlates included previous incarceration and moderate financial stability. Interaction analyses showed unemployed publicly insured individuals had 30% higher HCU than unemployed and uninsured individuals (χ2 = 2.52; p 

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