Social place as a location of potential core transmitters-implications for the targeted control of sexually transmitted disease transmission in urban areas

Jacky M. Jennings, Sarah Polk, Caroline Fichtenberg, Shang en Chung, Jonathan M. Ellen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: Places are an important determinant of risk for sexually transmitted infection (STI) acquisition and transmission. We sought to identify social places that are critical for targeted STI control activities. The objective of this study was to determine whether sex partner meeting places characterized by drug markets, sex markets, and separately, drug and/or sex markets were more likely to have potential core transmitters as compared with other sex partner meeting places in one urban setting. Methods: In 2008-2009, heterosexual sex partner places or venues were identified in Baltimore, MD using a venue-based study approach. Results: A total of 1334 participants aged 18 to 35 years were enrolled at 85 venues. In those participants, 39 potential core transmitters were identified and 31% of venues had at least one potential core transmitter. In final age-adjusted and gender-adjusted models, core transmitters were significantly more likely to be identified at drug markets (OR = 1.37; 95% CI = 1.23-1.53), sex markets (OR = 1.27; 95% CI = 1.14-1.41), and drug and/or sex markets (OR = 1.49; 95% CI = 1.32-1.68). Conclusions: This study identified key characteristics of venues, such as drug and sex market activity, that may be important in identifying places for the targeted control of STI transmission.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)861-867
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of epidemiology
Volume25
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2015

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Heterosexuality
  • Sexually transmitted disease
  • Social environment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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