Social network perspective on alcohol consumption among African American women: a longitudinal analysis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: The aim of the study was to examine alcohol use in African American women’s social networks. Design: This was a longitudinal study of African American women and their social networks in Baltimore, MD. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews at a community-based research clinic. Alcohol consumption frequency was assessed by a single question ‘How often do you drink alcohol?’ with a four-point ordinal rating scale ‘never,’ ‘monthly or less,’ ‘2–4 times a month’ and ‘>2 times a week.’ A longitudinal ordinal logistic model was conducted to use 317 African American women’s alcohol consumption frequency as a predictor of their social networks’ alcohol consumption frequency. Results: Results show that African American women’s alcohol consumption frequency was a statistically significant predictor of their social network members’ alcohol consumption frequency. Conclusion: Findings suggest the merit of social network-based approaches to address alcohol use among urban minority populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalEthnicity and Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Feb 11 2017

Fingerprint

alcohol consumption
Social Support
Alcohol Drinking
African Americans
social network
alcohol
Alcohols
Baltimore
Urban Population
rating scale
Longitudinal Studies
longitudinal study
Logistic Models
logistics
American
Alcohol
Social Networks
Longitudinal Analysis
African American Women
minority

Keywords

  • African American
  • Alcohol consumption
  • longitudinal data analysis
  • social network

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{2a075a74520f457eb78e7cfc4fc5ff55,
title = "Social network perspective on alcohol consumption among African American women: a longitudinal analysis",
abstract = "Objective: The aim of the study was to examine alcohol use in African American women’s social networks. Design: This was a longitudinal study of African American women and their social networks in Baltimore, MD. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews at a community-based research clinic. Alcohol consumption frequency was assessed by a single question ‘How often do you drink alcohol?’ with a four-point ordinal rating scale ‘never,’ ‘monthly or less,’ ‘2–4 times a month’ and ‘>2 times a week.’ A longitudinal ordinal logistic model was conducted to use 317 African American women’s alcohol consumption frequency as a predictor of their social networks’ alcohol consumption frequency. Results: Results show that African American women’s alcohol consumption frequency was a statistically significant predictor of their social network members’ alcohol consumption frequency. Conclusion: Findings suggest the merit of social network-based approaches to address alcohol use among urban minority populations.",
keywords = "African American, Alcohol consumption, longitudinal data analysis, social network",
author = "Cui Yang and Jingyan Yang and Melissa Davey-Rothwell and Latkin, {Carl A}",
year = "2017",
month = "2",
day = "11",
doi = "10.1080/13557858.2017.1290215",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "1--8",
journal = "Ethnicity and Health",
issn = "1355-7858",
publisher = "Routledge",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Social network perspective on alcohol consumption among African American women

T2 - a longitudinal analysis

AU - Yang, Cui

AU - Yang, Jingyan

AU - Davey-Rothwell, Melissa

AU - Latkin, Carl A

PY - 2017/2/11

Y1 - 2017/2/11

N2 - Objective: The aim of the study was to examine alcohol use in African American women’s social networks. Design: This was a longitudinal study of African American women and their social networks in Baltimore, MD. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews at a community-based research clinic. Alcohol consumption frequency was assessed by a single question ‘How often do you drink alcohol?’ with a four-point ordinal rating scale ‘never,’ ‘monthly or less,’ ‘2–4 times a month’ and ‘>2 times a week.’ A longitudinal ordinal logistic model was conducted to use 317 African American women’s alcohol consumption frequency as a predictor of their social networks’ alcohol consumption frequency. Results: Results show that African American women’s alcohol consumption frequency was a statistically significant predictor of their social network members’ alcohol consumption frequency. Conclusion: Findings suggest the merit of social network-based approaches to address alcohol use among urban minority populations.

AB - Objective: The aim of the study was to examine alcohol use in African American women’s social networks. Design: This was a longitudinal study of African American women and their social networks in Baltimore, MD. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews at a community-based research clinic. Alcohol consumption frequency was assessed by a single question ‘How often do you drink alcohol?’ with a four-point ordinal rating scale ‘never,’ ‘monthly or less,’ ‘2–4 times a month’ and ‘>2 times a week.’ A longitudinal ordinal logistic model was conducted to use 317 African American women’s alcohol consumption frequency as a predictor of their social networks’ alcohol consumption frequency. Results: Results show that African American women’s alcohol consumption frequency was a statistically significant predictor of their social network members’ alcohol consumption frequency. Conclusion: Findings suggest the merit of social network-based approaches to address alcohol use among urban minority populations.

KW - African American

KW - Alcohol consumption

KW - longitudinal data analysis

KW - social network

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85012083535&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85012083535&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/13557858.2017.1290215

DO - 10.1080/13557858.2017.1290215

M3 - Article

C2 - 28277027

AN - SCOPUS:85012083535

SP - 1

EP - 8

JO - Ethnicity and Health

JF - Ethnicity and Health

SN - 1355-7858

ER -