Social network perspective on alcohol consumption among African American women: a longitudinal analysis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: The aim of the study was to examine alcohol use in African American women’s social networks. Design: This was a longitudinal study of African American women and their social networks in Baltimore, MD. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews at a community-based research clinic. Alcohol consumption frequency was assessed by a single question ‘How often do you drink alcohol?’ with a four-point ordinal rating scale ‘never,’ ‘monthly or less,’ ‘2–4 times a month’ and ‘>2 times a week.’ A longitudinal ordinal logistic model was conducted to use 317 African American women’s alcohol consumption frequency as a predictor of their social networks’ alcohol consumption frequency. Results: Results show that African American women’s alcohol consumption frequency was a statistically significant predictor of their social network members’ alcohol consumption frequency. Conclusion: Findings suggest the merit of social network-based approaches to address alcohol use among urban minority populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)503-510
Number of pages8
JournalEthnicity and Health
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 4 2018

Keywords

  • African American
  • Alcohol consumption
  • longitudinal data analysis
  • social network

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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