Social Network Factors as Correlates and Predictors of High Depressive Symptoms Among Black Men Who Have Sex with Men in HPTN 061

Carl A Latkin, Hong van Tieu, Sheldon Fields, Brett S. Hanscom, Matt Connor, Brett Hanscom, Sophia A. Hussen, Hyman M. Scott, Matthew J. Mimiaga, Leo Wilton, Manya Magnus, Iris Chen, Beryl A. Koblin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Depression is linked to a range of poor HIV-related health outcomes. Minorities and men who have sex with men (MSM), suffer from high rates of depression. The current study examined the relationship between depressive symptoms and social network characteristics among community-recruited Black MSM in HPTN 061 from 6 US cities. A social network inventory was administer at baseline and depression was assessed with the CES-D at baseline, 6, and 12-months. At baseline, which included 1167 HIV negative and 348 HIV positive participants, size of emotional, financial, and medical support networks were significantly associated with fewer depressive symptoms. In longitudinal mixed models, size of emotional, financial, and medical support networks were significantly associated with fewer depressive symptoms as was the number of network members seen weekly. In the multivariate analyses, size of medical appointment network remained statistically significant (aOR 0.89, CI 0.81–0.98). These findings highlight the importance of network support of medical care on depression and suggest the value of support mobilization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalAIDS and Behavior
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Aug 1 2016

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Social Support
Depression
Financial Support
HIV
Appointments and Schedules
Multivariate Analysis
Equipment and Supplies
Health

Keywords

  • African American
  • Black MSM
  • Depression
  • HIV
  • Social networks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Social Network Factors as Correlates and Predictors of High Depressive Symptoms Among Black Men Who Have Sex with Men in HPTN 061. / Latkin, Carl A; van Tieu, Hong; Fields, Sheldon; Hanscom, Brett S.; Connor, Matt; Hanscom, Brett; Hussen, Sophia A.; Scott, Hyman M.; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Wilton, Leo; Magnus, Manya; Chen, Iris; Koblin, Beryl A.

In: AIDS and Behavior, 01.08.2016, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Latkin, CA, van Tieu, H, Fields, S, Hanscom, BS, Connor, M, Hanscom, B, Hussen, SA, Scott, HM, Mimiaga, MJ, Wilton, L, Magnus, M, Chen, I & Koblin, BA 2016, 'Social Network Factors as Correlates and Predictors of High Depressive Symptoms Among Black Men Who Have Sex with Men in HPTN 061', AIDS and Behavior, pp. 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-016-1493-8
Latkin, Carl A ; van Tieu, Hong ; Fields, Sheldon ; Hanscom, Brett S. ; Connor, Matt ; Hanscom, Brett ; Hussen, Sophia A. ; Scott, Hyman M. ; Mimiaga, Matthew J. ; Wilton, Leo ; Magnus, Manya ; Chen, Iris ; Koblin, Beryl A. / Social Network Factors as Correlates and Predictors of High Depressive Symptoms Among Black Men Who Have Sex with Men in HPTN 061. In: AIDS and Behavior. 2016 ; pp. 1-8.
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