Social integration in young adulthood and the subsequent onset of substance use and disorders among a community population of urban African Americans

Kerry M. Green, Elaine E. Doherty, Heather S. Reisinger, Howard D. Chilcoat, Margaret Ensminger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aims This paper examines the association between social integration in young adulthood and the later onset of substance use and disorders through mid-adulthood. Design Data come from a community cohort of African Americans followed longitudinally from age 6-42 years with four assessment periods. Setting The cohort all lived in the Woodlawn neighborhood of Chicago in 1966, an urban disadvantaged setting. Participants All Woodlawn first graders in 1966 were asked to participate; 13 families declined (n = 1242). Measurement Substance use was measured via interview at age 42 and includes the onset of alcohol and drug use disorders and the onset of cocaine/heroin use between ages 32 and 42 years. Social integration measures were assessed via interview at age 32 and include social roles (employee, spouse, parent), participation in religious and social organizations and a measure of overall social integration. Control variables were measured in childhood and later in the life course. Findings Multivariate regression analyses suggest that unemployment, being unmarried, infrequent religious service attendance and lower overall social integration in young adulthood predict later adult-onset drug use disorders, but not alcohol use disorders once confounders are taken into consideration. Unemployment and lower overall social integration predict onset of cocaine/heroin use later in adulthood. Conclusions Results show meaningful onset of drug use and substance use disorders during mid-adulthood and that social integration in young adulthood seems to play a role in later onset of drug use and drug disorders, but not alcohol disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)484-493
Number of pages10
JournalAddiction
Volume105
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2010

Fingerprint

Urban Population
African Americans
Substance-Related Disorders
Unemployment
Heroin
Alcohols
Cocaine
Interviews
Vulnerable Populations
Spouses
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Multivariate Analysis
Regression Analysis
Organizations

Keywords

  • Adult-onset substance use
  • Adult-onset substance use disorders
  • African Americans
  • Social integration
  • Social roles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Social integration in young adulthood and the subsequent onset of substance use and disorders among a community population of urban African Americans. / Green, Kerry M.; Doherty, Elaine E.; Reisinger, Heather S.; Chilcoat, Howard D.; Ensminger, Margaret.

In: Addiction, Vol. 105, No. 3, 03.2010, p. 484-493.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Green, Kerry M. ; Doherty, Elaine E. ; Reisinger, Heather S. ; Chilcoat, Howard D. ; Ensminger, Margaret. / Social integration in young adulthood and the subsequent onset of substance use and disorders among a community population of urban African Americans. In: Addiction. 2010 ; Vol. 105, No. 3. pp. 484-493.
@article{9719c5d735284baf8dc2c79e85d9b329,
title = "Social integration in young adulthood and the subsequent onset of substance use and disorders among a community population of urban African Americans",
abstract = "Aims This paper examines the association between social integration in young adulthood and the later onset of substance use and disorders through mid-adulthood. Design Data come from a community cohort of African Americans followed longitudinally from age 6-42 years with four assessment periods. Setting The cohort all lived in the Woodlawn neighborhood of Chicago in 1966, an urban disadvantaged setting. Participants All Woodlawn first graders in 1966 were asked to participate; 13 families declined (n = 1242). Measurement Substance use was measured via interview at age 42 and includes the onset of alcohol and drug use disorders and the onset of cocaine/heroin use between ages 32 and 42 years. Social integration measures were assessed via interview at age 32 and include social roles (employee, spouse, parent), participation in religious and social organizations and a measure of overall social integration. Control variables were measured in childhood and later in the life course. Findings Multivariate regression analyses suggest that unemployment, being unmarried, infrequent religious service attendance and lower overall social integration in young adulthood predict later adult-onset drug use disorders, but not alcohol use disorders once confounders are taken into consideration. Unemployment and lower overall social integration predict onset of cocaine/heroin use later in adulthood. Conclusions Results show meaningful onset of drug use and substance use disorders during mid-adulthood and that social integration in young adulthood seems to play a role in later onset of drug use and drug disorders, but not alcohol disorders.",
keywords = "Adult-onset substance use, Adult-onset substance use disorders, African Americans, Social integration, Social roles",
author = "Green, {Kerry M.} and Doherty, {Elaine E.} and Reisinger, {Heather S.} and Chilcoat, {Howard D.} and Margaret Ensminger",
year = "2010",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1111/j.1360-0443.2009.02787.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "105",
pages = "484--493",
journal = "Addiction",
issn = "0965-2140",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Social integration in young adulthood and the subsequent onset of substance use and disorders among a community population of urban African Americans

AU - Green, Kerry M.

AU - Doherty, Elaine E.

AU - Reisinger, Heather S.

AU - Chilcoat, Howard D.

AU - Ensminger, Margaret

PY - 2010/3

Y1 - 2010/3

N2 - Aims This paper examines the association between social integration in young adulthood and the later onset of substance use and disorders through mid-adulthood. Design Data come from a community cohort of African Americans followed longitudinally from age 6-42 years with four assessment periods. Setting The cohort all lived in the Woodlawn neighborhood of Chicago in 1966, an urban disadvantaged setting. Participants All Woodlawn first graders in 1966 were asked to participate; 13 families declined (n = 1242). Measurement Substance use was measured via interview at age 42 and includes the onset of alcohol and drug use disorders and the onset of cocaine/heroin use between ages 32 and 42 years. Social integration measures were assessed via interview at age 32 and include social roles (employee, spouse, parent), participation in religious and social organizations and a measure of overall social integration. Control variables were measured in childhood and later in the life course. Findings Multivariate regression analyses suggest that unemployment, being unmarried, infrequent religious service attendance and lower overall social integration in young adulthood predict later adult-onset drug use disorders, but not alcohol use disorders once confounders are taken into consideration. Unemployment and lower overall social integration predict onset of cocaine/heroin use later in adulthood. Conclusions Results show meaningful onset of drug use and substance use disorders during mid-adulthood and that social integration in young adulthood seems to play a role in later onset of drug use and drug disorders, but not alcohol disorders.

AB - Aims This paper examines the association between social integration in young adulthood and the later onset of substance use and disorders through mid-adulthood. Design Data come from a community cohort of African Americans followed longitudinally from age 6-42 years with four assessment periods. Setting The cohort all lived in the Woodlawn neighborhood of Chicago in 1966, an urban disadvantaged setting. Participants All Woodlawn first graders in 1966 were asked to participate; 13 families declined (n = 1242). Measurement Substance use was measured via interview at age 42 and includes the onset of alcohol and drug use disorders and the onset of cocaine/heroin use between ages 32 and 42 years. Social integration measures were assessed via interview at age 32 and include social roles (employee, spouse, parent), participation in religious and social organizations and a measure of overall social integration. Control variables were measured in childhood and later in the life course. Findings Multivariate regression analyses suggest that unemployment, being unmarried, infrequent religious service attendance and lower overall social integration in young adulthood predict later adult-onset drug use disorders, but not alcohol use disorders once confounders are taken into consideration. Unemployment and lower overall social integration predict onset of cocaine/heroin use later in adulthood. Conclusions Results show meaningful onset of drug use and substance use disorders during mid-adulthood and that social integration in young adulthood seems to play a role in later onset of drug use and drug disorders, but not alcohol disorders.

KW - Adult-onset substance use

KW - Adult-onset substance use disorders

KW - African Americans

KW - Social integration

KW - Social roles

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=76249133638&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=76249133638&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2009.02787.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2009.02787.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 20402992

AN - SCOPUS:76249133638

VL - 105

SP - 484

EP - 493

JO - Addiction

JF - Addiction

SN - 0965-2140

IS - 3

ER -