Social factors matter in cancer risk and survivorship

Lorraine Dean, Sarah Gehlert, Marian L. Neuhouser, April Oh, Krista Zanetti, Melody Goodman, Beti Thompson, Kala Visvanathan, Kathryn H. Schmitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Greater attention to social factors, such as race/ethnicity, socioeconomic position, and others, are needed across the cancer continuum, including breast cancer, given differences in tumor biology and genetic variants have not completely explained the persistent Black/White breast cancer mortality disparity. In this commentary, we use examples in breast cancer risk assessment and survivorship to demonstrate how the failure to appropriately incorporate social factors into the design, recruitment, and analysis of research studies has resulted in missed opportunities to reduce persistent cancer disparities. The conclusion offers recommendations for how to better document and use information on social factors in cancer research and care by (1) increasing education and awareness about the importance of inclusion of social factors in clinical research; (2) improving testing and documentation of social factors by incorporating them into journal guidelines and reporting stratified results; and (3) including social factors to refine extant tools that assess cancer risk and assign cancer care. Implementing the recommended changes would enable more effective design and implementation of interventions and work toward eliminating cancer disparities by accounting for the social and environmental contexts in which cancer patients live and are treated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Causes and Control
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 30 2018

Fingerprint

Survival Rate
Neoplasms
Breast Neoplasms
Research
Documentation
Guidelines
Education
Mortality

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Disparities
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Social determinants
  • United States

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Dean, L., Gehlert, S., Neuhouser, M. L., Oh, A., Zanetti, K., Goodman, M., ... Schmitz, K. H. (Accepted/In press). Social factors matter in cancer risk and survivorship. Cancer Causes and Control, 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-018-1043-y

Social factors matter in cancer risk and survivorship. / Dean, Lorraine; Gehlert, Sarah; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Oh, April; Zanetti, Krista; Goodman, Melody; Thompson, Beti; Visvanathan, Kala; Schmitz, Kathryn H.

In: Cancer Causes and Control, 30.05.2018, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dean, L, Gehlert, S, Neuhouser, ML, Oh, A, Zanetti, K, Goodman, M, Thompson, B, Visvanathan, K & Schmitz, KH 2018, 'Social factors matter in cancer risk and survivorship', Cancer Causes and Control, pp. 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-018-1043-y
Dean, Lorraine ; Gehlert, Sarah ; Neuhouser, Marian L. ; Oh, April ; Zanetti, Krista ; Goodman, Melody ; Thompson, Beti ; Visvanathan, Kala ; Schmitz, Kathryn H. / Social factors matter in cancer risk and survivorship. In: Cancer Causes and Control. 2018 ; pp. 1-8.
@article{5cfb26a49f534d7b9b69a1f58a0fe619,
title = "Social factors matter in cancer risk and survivorship",
abstract = "Greater attention to social factors, such as race/ethnicity, socioeconomic position, and others, are needed across the cancer continuum, including breast cancer, given differences in tumor biology and genetic variants have not completely explained the persistent Black/White breast cancer mortality disparity. In this commentary, we use examples in breast cancer risk assessment and survivorship to demonstrate how the failure to appropriately incorporate social factors into the design, recruitment, and analysis of research studies has resulted in missed opportunities to reduce persistent cancer disparities. The conclusion offers recommendations for how to better document and use information on social factors in cancer research and care by (1) increasing education and awareness about the importance of inclusion of social factors in clinical research; (2) improving testing and documentation of social factors by incorporating them into journal guidelines and reporting stratified results; and (3) including social factors to refine extant tools that assess cancer risk and assign cancer care. Implementing the recommended changes would enable more effective design and implementation of interventions and work toward eliminating cancer disparities by accounting for the social and environmental contexts in which cancer patients live and are treated.",
keywords = "Breast cancer, Disparities, Race/ethnicity, Social determinants, United States",
author = "Lorraine Dean and Sarah Gehlert and Neuhouser, {Marian L.} and April Oh and Krista Zanetti and Melody Goodman and Beti Thompson and Kala Visvanathan and Schmitz, {Kathryn H.}",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
day = "30",
doi = "10.1007/s10552-018-1043-y",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "1--8",
journal = "Cancer Causes and Control",
issn = "0957-5243",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Social factors matter in cancer risk and survivorship

AU - Dean, Lorraine

AU - Gehlert, Sarah

AU - Neuhouser, Marian L.

AU - Oh, April

AU - Zanetti, Krista

AU - Goodman, Melody

AU - Thompson, Beti

AU - Visvanathan, Kala

AU - Schmitz, Kathryn H.

PY - 2018/5/30

Y1 - 2018/5/30

N2 - Greater attention to social factors, such as race/ethnicity, socioeconomic position, and others, are needed across the cancer continuum, including breast cancer, given differences in tumor biology and genetic variants have not completely explained the persistent Black/White breast cancer mortality disparity. In this commentary, we use examples in breast cancer risk assessment and survivorship to demonstrate how the failure to appropriately incorporate social factors into the design, recruitment, and analysis of research studies has resulted in missed opportunities to reduce persistent cancer disparities. The conclusion offers recommendations for how to better document and use information on social factors in cancer research and care by (1) increasing education and awareness about the importance of inclusion of social factors in clinical research; (2) improving testing and documentation of social factors by incorporating them into journal guidelines and reporting stratified results; and (3) including social factors to refine extant tools that assess cancer risk and assign cancer care. Implementing the recommended changes would enable more effective design and implementation of interventions and work toward eliminating cancer disparities by accounting for the social and environmental contexts in which cancer patients live and are treated.

AB - Greater attention to social factors, such as race/ethnicity, socioeconomic position, and others, are needed across the cancer continuum, including breast cancer, given differences in tumor biology and genetic variants have not completely explained the persistent Black/White breast cancer mortality disparity. In this commentary, we use examples in breast cancer risk assessment and survivorship to demonstrate how the failure to appropriately incorporate social factors into the design, recruitment, and analysis of research studies has resulted in missed opportunities to reduce persistent cancer disparities. The conclusion offers recommendations for how to better document and use information on social factors in cancer research and care by (1) increasing education and awareness about the importance of inclusion of social factors in clinical research; (2) improving testing and documentation of social factors by incorporating them into journal guidelines and reporting stratified results; and (3) including social factors to refine extant tools that assess cancer risk and assign cancer care. Implementing the recommended changes would enable more effective design and implementation of interventions and work toward eliminating cancer disparities by accounting for the social and environmental contexts in which cancer patients live and are treated.

KW - Breast cancer

KW - Disparities

KW - Race/ethnicity

KW - Social determinants

KW - United States

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85047791546&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85047791546&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10552-018-1043-y

DO - 10.1007/s10552-018-1043-y

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 8

JO - Cancer Causes and Control

JF - Cancer Causes and Control

SN - 0957-5243

ER -