Social connectedness, social appraisal, and perceived stress in college women and men

Richard M. Lee, Kelli A. Keough, Janel D. Sexton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined the effects of social connectedness, social appraisal of the campus climate, and perceived stress of college women and men. Drawing from self-verification theory, social appraisal was hypothesized to mediate the effects of connectedness on perceived stress, Two hundred and fourteen college students were surveyed. Results support a partial mediation effect for women. Men, however, were more likely to negatively appraise the campus climate, and social connectedness was more negatively related to perceived stress for men than for women. Results are interpreted according to gender differences in independent and interdependent self-construal. The need to clearly define and measure social connectedness and social appraisal is also discussed. Counseling implications focus on the promotion and assessment of connectedness on campus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)355-361
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Counseling and Development
Volume80
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

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