Smooth scaling ahead

Progressive MAS simulation from single PCs to grids

Les Gasser, Kelvin Kakugawa, Brant Chee, Marc Esteva

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The emerging "Computational Grid" infrastructure poses many new opportunities for the developing science of large scale multi-agent simulation. The ability to migrate agent experiments seamlessly from simple, local single-processor development tools to large-scale distributed simulation environments provides valuable new models for experimentation and software engineering: first develop local, flexible prototypes, then as they become more stable progressively deploy and experiment with them at larger scales. Currently this kind of progressive scalability is hard for both practical and theoretical reasons: Practically, most agent platforms are designed for just one environment of operation. Smooth scalability is more than a matter of increasing agent numbers. Smooth scaling requires clear integration and consistent alignment between a variety of MAS system and simulation architectures and differing underlying infrastructures. This paper reports on recent progress with our experimental platform MACE3J, which now simulates MAS models seamlessly across a variety of scales and architecture types, from single PCs, to Single System Image (SSI) multicomputers, to heterogeneous distributed Grid environments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Pages1-10
Number of pages10
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
Externally publishedYes
EventJoint Workshop MABS 2004 - New York, NY, United States
Duration: Jul 19 2004Jul 23 2004

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume3415 LNAI
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Other

OtherJoint Workshop MABS 2004
CountryUnited States
CityNew York, NY
Period7/19/047/23/04

Fingerprint

Scaling
Grid
Scalability
Infrastructure
Multi-agent Simulation
Multicomputers
Simulation
Computational Grid
Distributed Simulation
Distributed Environment
Simulation Environment
Software Engineering
Experimentation
Experiment
Software engineering
Alignment
Experiments
Prototype
Model
Architecture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Theoretical Computer Science
  • Computer Science(all)

Cite this

Gasser, L., Kakugawa, K., Chee, B., & Esteva, M. (2005). Smooth scaling ahead: Progressive MAS simulation from single PCs to grids. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) (pp. 1-10). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 3415 LNAI).

Smooth scaling ahead : Progressive MAS simulation from single PCs to grids. / Gasser, Les; Kakugawa, Kelvin; Chee, Brant; Esteva, Marc.

Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). 2005. p. 1-10 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 3415 LNAI).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Gasser, L, Kakugawa, K, Chee, B & Esteva, M 2005, Smooth scaling ahead: Progressive MAS simulation from single PCs to grids. in Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 3415 LNAI, pp. 1-10, Joint Workshop MABS 2004, New York, NY, United States, 7/19/04.
Gasser L, Kakugawa K, Chee B, Esteva M. Smooth scaling ahead: Progressive MAS simulation from single PCs to grids. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). 2005. p. 1-10. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
Gasser, Les ; Kakugawa, Kelvin ; Chee, Brant ; Esteva, Marc. / Smooth scaling ahead : Progressive MAS simulation from single PCs to grids. Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). 2005. pp. 1-10 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
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