Smoking without nicotine delivery decreases withdrawal in 12-hour abstinent smokers

Marsha F. Butschky, Denise Bailey, Jack E. Henningfield, Wallace B. Pickworth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The contribution of sensory factors to smoking satisfaction and nicotine withdrawal symptoms was assessed by evaluating responses to three types of cigarettes: a regular cigarette, a de-nicotinized cigarette (de-nic), and a lettuce leaf cigarette. Doses were varied by requiring subjects to smoke cigarettes using a five-port cigarette manifold. The ratio of the regular or de-nic cigarettes to the lettuce cigarettes was varied across the following values: zero, one, two, and four of five. Seven male smokers were tobacco-deprived for 12 h before testing. On one test day they smoked the de-nic cigarettes, and on another day they smoked the regular cigarettes. Ratings of satisfaction and cigarette liking were directly related to the number of regular or de-nic cigarettes, but were generally higher after the regular cigarette. The regular and de-nic cigarettes were equivalent in reducing acute withdrawal symptoms. Expired CO was similar on both experimental days. The regular cigarette dose-dependently increased plasma nicotine, but the de-nic cigarette did not increase plasma nicotine. These results indicate that sensory characteristics of cigarettes contribute to the abuse liability of smoke-delivered nicotine. The results suggest that smoking cigarettes that do not provide nicotine may temporarily suppress cigarette withdrawal symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-96
Number of pages6
JournalPharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior
Volume50
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995

Fingerprint

Nicotine
Tobacco Products
Smoking
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome
Lettuce
Smoke
Plasmas
Tobacco
Carbon Monoxide

Keywords

  • De-nicotinized cigarette
  • Sensory factors
  • Smoking behavior
  • Tobacco withdrawal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Pharmacology
  • Toxicology

Cite this

Smoking without nicotine delivery decreases withdrawal in 12-hour abstinent smokers. / Butschky, Marsha F.; Bailey, Denise; Henningfield, Jack E.; Pickworth, Wallace B.

In: Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, Vol. 50, No. 1, 1995, p. 91-96.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Butschky, Marsha F. ; Bailey, Denise ; Henningfield, Jack E. ; Pickworth, Wallace B. / Smoking without nicotine delivery decreases withdrawal in 12-hour abstinent smokers. In: Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior. 1995 ; Vol. 50, No. 1. pp. 91-96.
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