Smoking status and metabolic syndrome in the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis. A cross-sectional study

Ivan Berlin, Susan Lin, Joao Lima, Alain Gerald Bertoni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Current smoking is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance but its association with the metabolic syndrome (metS), particularly with sufficiently sampled African American representation, has not been clearly established. Objective. To assess whether a) metS is associated with smoking; b) any increased risk of metS among smokers is independent of body mass index (BMI) compared with non-smokers; c) smoking status is differentially associated with the metS and its components across different ethnic groups. Methods. Cross sectional analysis of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) a community population-based sample free of cardiovascular disease. Results: Current smokers (N=769) had higher risk of metS (odds ratio [OR, 95% confidence interval]: 1.4, 1.1-1.7) versus never (reference, N=2981) and former smokers (1.0, 0.8-1.1, N=2163) and for metS components: high waist circumference (WC) (OR:1.9, 1.2-2.1), low high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (1.5, 1.3-1.8), elevated plasma triglycerides (TG) (OR:1.4, 1.2-1.7) as well as high C-reactive protein (CRP, an inflammatory marker) concentration (OR: 1.6,1.3-2.0) compared to never and former smokers after adjustment for BMI. A smoking status by ethnicity interaction occurred such that African American current and former smokers had greater likelihood of low HDL-C than White counterparts. Conclusions: This study found that smoking is associated with the metS and despite the lower BMI of current smokers the prevalence of low HDL-C, elevated TG and CRP is higher among them than among non-smokers. African Americans generally have higher HDL-C than Whites but smoking wipes out this advantage. Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00005487.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number9
JournalTobacco Induced Diseases
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

Fingerprint

cross-sectional study
smoking
Atherosclerosis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Smoking
HDL Cholesterol
African Americans
LDL Cholesterol
Body Mass Index
Triglycerides
Glucose Intolerance
Waist Circumference
chronic illness
tolerance
Ethnic Groups
ethnic group
C-Reactive Protein
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
ethnicity
confidence

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • Ethnic groups
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Smoking status and metabolic syndrome in the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis. A cross-sectional study. / Berlin, Ivan; Lin, Susan; Lima, Joao; Bertoni, Alain Gerald.

In: Tobacco Induced Diseases, Vol. 10, No. 1, 9, 2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ef60efdc87374564ae9cdbcee36cef23,
title = "Smoking status and metabolic syndrome in the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis. A cross-sectional study",
abstract = "Background: Current smoking is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance but its association with the metabolic syndrome (metS), particularly with sufficiently sampled African American representation, has not been clearly established. Objective. To assess whether a) metS is associated with smoking; b) any increased risk of metS among smokers is independent of body mass index (BMI) compared with non-smokers; c) smoking status is differentially associated with the metS and its components across different ethnic groups. Methods. Cross sectional analysis of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) a community population-based sample free of cardiovascular disease. Results: Current smokers (N=769) had higher risk of metS (odds ratio [OR, 95{\%} confidence interval]: 1.4, 1.1-1.7) versus never (reference, N=2981) and former smokers (1.0, 0.8-1.1, N=2163) and for metS components: high waist circumference (WC) (OR:1.9, 1.2-2.1), low high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (1.5, 1.3-1.8), elevated plasma triglycerides (TG) (OR:1.4, 1.2-1.7) as well as high C-reactive protein (CRP, an inflammatory marker) concentration (OR: 1.6,1.3-2.0) compared to never and former smokers after adjustment for BMI. A smoking status by ethnicity interaction occurred such that African American current and former smokers had greater likelihood of low HDL-C than White counterparts. Conclusions: This study found that smoking is associated with the metS and despite the lower BMI of current smokers the prevalence of low HDL-C, elevated TG and CRP is higher among them than among non-smokers. African Americans generally have higher HDL-C than Whites but smoking wipes out this advantage. Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00005487.",
keywords = "Body mass index, Ethnic groups, Metabolic syndrome, Smoking",
author = "Ivan Berlin and Susan Lin and Joao Lima and Bertoni, {Alain Gerald}",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1186/1617-9625-10-9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
journal = "Tobacco Induced Diseases",
issn = "1617-9625",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Smoking status and metabolic syndrome in the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis. A cross-sectional study

AU - Berlin, Ivan

AU - Lin, Susan

AU - Lima, Joao

AU - Bertoni, Alain Gerald

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Background: Current smoking is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance but its association with the metabolic syndrome (metS), particularly with sufficiently sampled African American representation, has not been clearly established. Objective. To assess whether a) metS is associated with smoking; b) any increased risk of metS among smokers is independent of body mass index (BMI) compared with non-smokers; c) smoking status is differentially associated with the metS and its components across different ethnic groups. Methods. Cross sectional analysis of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) a community population-based sample free of cardiovascular disease. Results: Current smokers (N=769) had higher risk of metS (odds ratio [OR, 95% confidence interval]: 1.4, 1.1-1.7) versus never (reference, N=2981) and former smokers (1.0, 0.8-1.1, N=2163) and for metS components: high waist circumference (WC) (OR:1.9, 1.2-2.1), low high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (1.5, 1.3-1.8), elevated plasma triglycerides (TG) (OR:1.4, 1.2-1.7) as well as high C-reactive protein (CRP, an inflammatory marker) concentration (OR: 1.6,1.3-2.0) compared to never and former smokers after adjustment for BMI. A smoking status by ethnicity interaction occurred such that African American current and former smokers had greater likelihood of low HDL-C than White counterparts. Conclusions: This study found that smoking is associated with the metS and despite the lower BMI of current smokers the prevalence of low HDL-C, elevated TG and CRP is higher among them than among non-smokers. African Americans generally have higher HDL-C than Whites but smoking wipes out this advantage. Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00005487.

AB - Background: Current smoking is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance but its association with the metabolic syndrome (metS), particularly with sufficiently sampled African American representation, has not been clearly established. Objective. To assess whether a) metS is associated with smoking; b) any increased risk of metS among smokers is independent of body mass index (BMI) compared with non-smokers; c) smoking status is differentially associated with the metS and its components across different ethnic groups. Methods. Cross sectional analysis of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) a community population-based sample free of cardiovascular disease. Results: Current smokers (N=769) had higher risk of metS (odds ratio [OR, 95% confidence interval]: 1.4, 1.1-1.7) versus never (reference, N=2981) and former smokers (1.0, 0.8-1.1, N=2163) and for metS components: high waist circumference (WC) (OR:1.9, 1.2-2.1), low high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (1.5, 1.3-1.8), elevated plasma triglycerides (TG) (OR:1.4, 1.2-1.7) as well as high C-reactive protein (CRP, an inflammatory marker) concentration (OR: 1.6,1.3-2.0) compared to never and former smokers after adjustment for BMI. A smoking status by ethnicity interaction occurred such that African American current and former smokers had greater likelihood of low HDL-C than White counterparts. Conclusions: This study found that smoking is associated with the metS and despite the lower BMI of current smokers the prevalence of low HDL-C, elevated TG and CRP is higher among them than among non-smokers. African Americans generally have higher HDL-C than Whites but smoking wipes out this advantage. Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00005487.

KW - Body mass index

KW - Ethnic groups

KW - Metabolic syndrome

KW - Smoking

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84862332287&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84862332287&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/1617-9625-10-9

DO - 10.1186/1617-9625-10-9

M3 - Article

VL - 10

JO - Tobacco Induced Diseases

JF - Tobacco Induced Diseases

SN - 1617-9625

IS - 1

M1 - 9

ER -