Smoking quit success genotype score predicts quit success and distinct patterns of developmental involvement with common addictive substances

G. R. Uhl, D. Walther, R. Musci, C. Fisher, J. C. Anthony, C. L. Storr, F. M. Behm, W. W. Eaton, N. Ialongo, J. E. Rose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Genotype scores that predict relevant clinical outcomes may detect other disease features and help direct prevention efforts. We report data that validate a previously established v1.0 smoking cessation quit success genotype score and describe striking differences in the score in individuals who display differing developmental trajectories of use of common addictive substances. In a cessation study, v1.0 genotype scores predicted ability to quit with P=0.00056 and area under receiver-operating characteristic curve 0.66. About 43% vs 13% quit in the upper vs lower genotype score terciles. Latent class growth analyses of a developmentally assessed sample identified three latent classes based on substance use. Higher v1.0 scores were associated with (a) higher probabilities of participant membership in a latent class that displayed low use of common addictive substances during adolescence (P=0.0004) and (b) lower probabilities of membership in a class that reported escalating use (P=0.001). These results indicate that: (a) we have identified genetic predictors of smoking cessation success, (b) genetic influences on quit success overlap with those that influence the rate at which addictive substance use is taken up during adolescence and (c) individuals at genetic risk for both escalating use of addictive substances and poor abilities to quit may provide especially urgent focus for prevention efforts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)50-54
Number of pages5
JournalMolecular psychiatry
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

Keywords

  • cannabis
  • complex genetics
  • development
  • genetic scores
  • predictive validity
  • smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Smoking quit success genotype score predicts quit success and distinct patterns of developmental involvement with common addictive substances'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this