Smoking habits and attitudes in a methadone maintenance treatment population

Philip Clemmey, Robert Brooner, Mary Ann Chutuape, Michael Kidorf, Maxine L Stitzer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study characterized smoking habits and attitudes about quitting in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) patients, with attention to race and gender differences. Of 179 patients surveyed, 92% (n = 165) were current smokers. These patients reported smoking a mean of 24.8 cigarettes per day. Mean age at smoking initiation was 13.6 years with 53% starting at age 13 or younger. The mean Fagerstrom tolerance questionnaire (FTQ) score was 7.5. Blacks as compared to Whites smoked fewer cigarettes per day (21.6 versus 27.5), had lower expired CO levels (18.8 versus 21.6 ppm), but higher urinary cotinine levels (1812 versus 1419 ng/ml) and were more likely to smoke menthol cigarettes (95 versus 46%). Females scored higher than males on the FTQ measure of nicotine dependence (8.0 versus 7.2), and lower than males on a measure of quit smoking self-efficacy. Subjects in the sample as a whole were well aware of health risks of smoking, as indicated by high scores on health risk perception questions. Sixty-one percent (n = 110) of subjects planned to quit within the next 6 months, 57% were 'very interested' in an on-site quit smoking program and 80% expressed interest in using nicotine replacement products. Overall, these results indicate high rates of smoking in MMT patients, confirm within a drug abusing population prior findings of racial differences in smoking habits, and suggest that MMT patients are interested in quitting and in using nicotine replacement products. The data support feasibility of implementing smoking cessation treatments with this population in a setting that allows for convenient access to patients and close monitoring of progress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-132
Number of pages10
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume44
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 14 1997

Fingerprint

Patient treatment
Methadone
Tobacco Products
Tobacco Use Cessation Products
Habits
habits
smoking
Health risks
Smoking
Population
Menthol
Risk perception
Cotinine
Carbon Monoxide
Nicotine
Smoke
nicotine
Therapeutics
health risk
tolerance

Keywords

  • Gender
  • Methadone maintenance
  • Race
  • Smoking
  • Smoking cessation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Toxicology
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Smoking habits and attitudes in a methadone maintenance treatment population. / Clemmey, Philip; Brooner, Robert; Chutuape, Mary Ann; Kidorf, Michael; Stitzer, Maxine L.

In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Vol. 44, No. 2-3, 14.03.1997, p. 123-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{37f60067dc784730878c79e0d45c9cd2,
title = "Smoking habits and attitudes in a methadone maintenance treatment population",
abstract = "This study characterized smoking habits and attitudes about quitting in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) patients, with attention to race and gender differences. Of 179 patients surveyed, 92{\%} (n = 165) were current smokers. These patients reported smoking a mean of 24.8 cigarettes per day. Mean age at smoking initiation was 13.6 years with 53{\%} starting at age 13 or younger. The mean Fagerstrom tolerance questionnaire (FTQ) score was 7.5. Blacks as compared to Whites smoked fewer cigarettes per day (21.6 versus 27.5), had lower expired CO levels (18.8 versus 21.6 ppm), but higher urinary cotinine levels (1812 versus 1419 ng/ml) and were more likely to smoke menthol cigarettes (95 versus 46{\%}). Females scored higher than males on the FTQ measure of nicotine dependence (8.0 versus 7.2), and lower than males on a measure of quit smoking self-efficacy. Subjects in the sample as a whole were well aware of health risks of smoking, as indicated by high scores on health risk perception questions. Sixty-one percent (n = 110) of subjects planned to quit within the next 6 months, 57{\%} were 'very interested' in an on-site quit smoking program and 80{\%} expressed interest in using nicotine replacement products. Overall, these results indicate high rates of smoking in MMT patients, confirm within a drug abusing population prior findings of racial differences in smoking habits, and suggest that MMT patients are interested in quitting and in using nicotine replacement products. The data support feasibility of implementing smoking cessation treatments with this population in a setting that allows for convenient access to patients and close monitoring of progress.",
keywords = "Gender, Methadone maintenance, Race, Smoking, Smoking cessation",
author = "Philip Clemmey and Robert Brooner and Chutuape, {Mary Ann} and Michael Kidorf and Stitzer, {Maxine L}",
year = "1997",
month = "3",
day = "14",
doi = "10.1016/S0376-8716(96)01331-2",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "44",
pages = "123--132",
journal = "Drug and Alcohol Dependence",
issn = "0376-8716",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "2-3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Smoking habits and attitudes in a methadone maintenance treatment population

AU - Clemmey, Philip

AU - Brooner, Robert

AU - Chutuape, Mary Ann

AU - Kidorf, Michael

AU - Stitzer, Maxine L

PY - 1997/3/14

Y1 - 1997/3/14

N2 - This study characterized smoking habits and attitudes about quitting in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) patients, with attention to race and gender differences. Of 179 patients surveyed, 92% (n = 165) were current smokers. These patients reported smoking a mean of 24.8 cigarettes per day. Mean age at smoking initiation was 13.6 years with 53% starting at age 13 or younger. The mean Fagerstrom tolerance questionnaire (FTQ) score was 7.5. Blacks as compared to Whites smoked fewer cigarettes per day (21.6 versus 27.5), had lower expired CO levels (18.8 versus 21.6 ppm), but higher urinary cotinine levels (1812 versus 1419 ng/ml) and were more likely to smoke menthol cigarettes (95 versus 46%). Females scored higher than males on the FTQ measure of nicotine dependence (8.0 versus 7.2), and lower than males on a measure of quit smoking self-efficacy. Subjects in the sample as a whole were well aware of health risks of smoking, as indicated by high scores on health risk perception questions. Sixty-one percent (n = 110) of subjects planned to quit within the next 6 months, 57% were 'very interested' in an on-site quit smoking program and 80% expressed interest in using nicotine replacement products. Overall, these results indicate high rates of smoking in MMT patients, confirm within a drug abusing population prior findings of racial differences in smoking habits, and suggest that MMT patients are interested in quitting and in using nicotine replacement products. The data support feasibility of implementing smoking cessation treatments with this population in a setting that allows for convenient access to patients and close monitoring of progress.

AB - This study characterized smoking habits and attitudes about quitting in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) patients, with attention to race and gender differences. Of 179 patients surveyed, 92% (n = 165) were current smokers. These patients reported smoking a mean of 24.8 cigarettes per day. Mean age at smoking initiation was 13.6 years with 53% starting at age 13 or younger. The mean Fagerstrom tolerance questionnaire (FTQ) score was 7.5. Blacks as compared to Whites smoked fewer cigarettes per day (21.6 versus 27.5), had lower expired CO levels (18.8 versus 21.6 ppm), but higher urinary cotinine levels (1812 versus 1419 ng/ml) and were more likely to smoke menthol cigarettes (95 versus 46%). Females scored higher than males on the FTQ measure of nicotine dependence (8.0 versus 7.2), and lower than males on a measure of quit smoking self-efficacy. Subjects in the sample as a whole were well aware of health risks of smoking, as indicated by high scores on health risk perception questions. Sixty-one percent (n = 110) of subjects planned to quit within the next 6 months, 57% were 'very interested' in an on-site quit smoking program and 80% expressed interest in using nicotine replacement products. Overall, these results indicate high rates of smoking in MMT patients, confirm within a drug abusing population prior findings of racial differences in smoking habits, and suggest that MMT patients are interested in quitting and in using nicotine replacement products. The data support feasibility of implementing smoking cessation treatments with this population in a setting that allows for convenient access to patients and close monitoring of progress.

KW - Gender

KW - Methadone maintenance

KW - Race

KW - Smoking

KW - Smoking cessation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030993860&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030993860&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0376-8716(96)01331-2

DO - 10.1016/S0376-8716(96)01331-2

M3 - Article

VL - 44

SP - 123

EP - 132

JO - Drug and Alcohol Dependence

JF - Drug and Alcohol Dependence

SN - 0376-8716

IS - 2-3

ER -